FAQ’s

Inspirational Quotes (1)

What T5 Inspirational Quotes Will Help My Game?

Never play poker with important money.” — Oklahoma Johnny

“I started with nothing. Fortunately, I have half of it left.” –Doyle “Dolly” Brunson

“No man is wise enough by himself.” — Plautus

Individuals play the game, but teams win championships.” — Author Unknown

Individual commitment to a group effort — that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” — Vince Lombardi

Teamwork divides the tasks and doubles the successes.” — Author Unknown

The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may have the greatest bunch of individual ‘stars’ in the world, but if they don’t play together, the club won’t be worth a dime.” — Babe Ruth

The greatest danger a team faces isn’t that it won’t become successful, but that it will, and then cease to improve.” — Mark Sanborn

Team Player: One who unites others toward a shared destiny through the sharing of information and ideas, empowering others and developing trust.” — Dennis Kinlaw

TEAMTogether Everyone Achieves More.” — Author Unknown

Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success.” — Henry Ford (1863-1947)

One man can be a crucial ingredient on a team, but one man cannot make a team.” — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (1947-?)

Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” — T.S. Elliott

The ‘Secret to Success’ is that it is not the absence of failure, but the absence of envy.” — Herodotus

Keep your fears to yourself, but share your courage.” — Robert Louis Stevenson

In teamwork, silence isn’t golden, it’s deadly.” — Mark Sanborn

v2.06272017

LLC (4)

Why Form a Corporate Entity?

DO YOU REALLY THINK THAT YOU HAVE NOTHING TO HIDE?

THINK AGAIN

THE BEST WAY TO AVOID BEING AN EASY TARGET FOR A LAWSUIT, IS TO NEVER MAINTAIN RECOVERABLE ASSETS IN PLAIN SIGHT. [1] [2]

THE HOW & WHY –

We live in an extremely litigious society. The chances of one of us becoming the target of a lawsuit is extremely high. Americans have a 1-in-4 chance of having a potentially devastating lawsuit filed against them. [3]

ASSET PRIVACY & PROTECTION –

Keep your wealth as insulated as you possibly can for privacy and asset protection. Even though most private arrangements are offshore, you can achieve a surprising degree of financial privacy and protection by properly configuring your domestic assets.

THE BEST REASON TO FORM A CORPORATE ENTITY IS TO AVOID BEING AN EASY TARGET FOR A LAWSUIT –

Much like a burglar sizes up potential targets to burglarize, looking for residences that are unlocked, unprotected (no bullet-proof vest or alarm system); or those that are unoccupied (no one at home); litigation seeks out the weak and unprotected. Simply put – an easy target. The process is a simple risk/reward analysis.

The world of litigation is no different (attorneys are just a slightly higher caliber thief). They look for easy targets, or at a minimum, targets that present with a high potential for reward. Again – a risk/cost/reward analysis.

When lawyers size you up to determine whether or not to file a lawsuit on behalf of a prospective client, the most important thing that they want to discover is – whether you have recoverable assets? Simply put, “Am I going to get rewarded/paid for my efforts to prosecute a lawsuit against this individual?

IN VIRTUALLY ALL CASES –  NO RECOVERABLE ASSETS TRANSLATES TO NO LAWSUIT FILED.

This is especially true if the litigation involves a contingency based fee (paid only out of the proceeds recovered from the target of the proposed litigation, and only if the litigation is successful).


[1] Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

[2] John D. Rockefeller once said: “Own Nothing, Control Everything

[3] There are currently between 80 and 90 million lawsuits filed in this country each year. That is over 150 lawsuits per minute. Over 70% of the world’s lawyers reside right here in the USA; and we are adding new lawyers at a rate of 50,000 per year.

Unfortunately there is no way to completely avoid the possibility of being sued. There is, however, a way to reduce the risk of a devastating lawsuit; and to protect yourself should a lawsuit be filed against you. What you need to do is to arrange your affairs so that any activity that could create the potential for a lawsuit is transacted in a manner that will not affect your personal assets. Whether the activity is an operating business, rental property, high profile poker wealth, or any other “risk” operation, you need to separate yourself from those operations through corporate entities (Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof).

If you do not own anything, or if it appears that you do not own anything, no lawyer will sue you unless someone is willing to pay their exorbitant hourly fees and roll the dice. If, on the other hand, the lawyer discovers substantial assets, he may very well take the case against you on a contingency basis. Attorney’s contingency fees in the US currently run in excess of 10 billion dollars per year.

Ever wonder why most legal firm names are followed by PS, PLLP, LLP, LLC or something similar? Lawyers know how to protect themselves and their assets. You can, and should do the same.

The best way to protect your personal assets in our highly litigious society, is to form a legal entity that is separate and distinct from yourself (a virtual bullet-proof vest). This legal entity can be in the form of a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust, or some combination thereof. Be mindful of the fact that, in order for a corporate entity to provide the protection you seek, it must be properly set up and operated. Additionally, the corporate entity type must fit your particular circumstance. When set up and operated properly, your corporate entity will not only provide the protection you seek (a virtual bullet-proof vest), it will pay for itself many times over in the form of fringe benefits and tax savings. It is the best insurance that you will ever purchase – bar none.

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What are the Top 15 Reason to Incorporate in Nevada?

THE NEVADA ADVANTAGE:

    • No Corporate Income Tax;

    • No Taxes on Corporate Shares;

    • No Franchise Tax;

    • No Personal Income Tax;

    • Nominal Annual Fees;

    • Nevada corporations may purchase, hold, sell or transfer shares of its own stock;

    • Nevada corporations may issue stock for capital, services, personal property, or real estate, including leases and options;

    • The directors may determine the value of any of these transactions, and their decision is final (absent fraud, a Nevada Board of Directors’ decision concerning financial matters/arrangements is conclusive and neither void nor voidable);

    • No Franchise Tax on Income;

    • No Inheritance or Gift Tax;

    • No Unitary Tax;

    • No Estate Tax;

    • Competitive Sales and Property Tax Rates;

    • Minimal Employer Payroll Tax – 0.7% of gross wages with deductions for employer paid health insurance; and

    • Nevada’s Business Court – Developed on the Delaware model, the Business Court in Nevada minimizes the time, cost and risks of commercial litigation by:

      • Early, comprehensive case management;

      • Active judicial participation in the settlement process;

      • Priority for hearing settings to avoid business disruption; and

      • Predictability of legal decisions in commercial matters.

    • LEGAL DISCLAIMER: Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

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How Do I Cause My Assets to be Less Recoverable?

FOUR WAYS TO INSURE THAT YOUR ASSETS ARE LESS RECOVERABLE:

(1)   Do not bank in the State in which you live, or that has a presence in the State in which you reside;

(2)   Do not possess a safe deposit box with a Bank in the State in which you reside;

(3)   Create a structure to house and protect your wealth (a Corporate Entity in the form of a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof); and

(4)   Transfer ownership of your assets to your protection vehicle/Corporate Entity (Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof) . [1]


[1] Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

v2.10072011

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What Are My Best Asset Protection Strategies?

MULTIPLE LINES OF DEFENSE TO PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY AND YOUR ASSETS, ARE YOUR BEST STRATEGY:

(1)   The first line of defense is to keep your assets (Bank accounts, securities accounts, etc.) in another State, and to avoid having a local Bank safety deposit box;

(2)   The second line of defense is to keep your assets out of your name; preferably in the name of a corporate entity that provides asset protection (Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof) [1]; and

(3)   The third and most extreme line of defense, is to park your assets offshore.

These strategies provide a high level of protection, but they are not iron-clad.

THE TIME TO ACT TO PROTECT YOUR ASSETS IS BEFORE YOU BECOME THE TARGET OF LITIGATION.

DON’T BE AN EASY TARGET FOR A LAWSUIT – NEVER MAINTAIN RECOVERABLE ASSETS IN PLAIN SIGHT. [2]


[1] Financial and legal experts agree that the two best States to form your corporate entity in are Nevada and Wyoming, because they provide protection almost equal to that of offshore corporate entities (and they incur far less scrutiny from the IRS than do offshore corporate entities). Why? The answer is simple: ownership interest is concealed in both Nevada and Wyoming corporate entities for the fact that they allow BEARER SHARES (anonymous ownership). The result: unless you physically possess the corporate shares, you can truthfully deny any ownership interest in the corporation. Additionally, NEVADA CORPORATIONS/LLC’S – are: (1) tax free; (2) do not share information with the IRS; (3) incur no franchise tax liability; (4) have no extensive annual disclosure requirements (only a current list of stock holders and shares held in bearer form with anonymous ownership is required); and (5) provide broader indemnities for corporate officers – for the fact that absent fraud, a Nevada Board of Directors’ decisions concerning financial matters/arrangements is considered to be conclusive and neither void nor voidable in the eyes of the law.

[2] Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

v2.10072011

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Lucas Lucas (4)

What are the Top 15 Reason to Incorporate in Nevada?

THE NEVADA ADVANTAGE:

    • No Corporate Income Tax;

    • No Taxes on Corporate Shares;

    • No Franchise Tax;

    • No Personal Income Tax;

    • Nominal Annual Fees;

    • Nevada corporations may purchase, hold, sell or transfer shares of its own stock;

    • Nevada corporations may issue stock for capital, services, personal property, or real estate, including leases and options;

    • The directors may determine the value of any of these transactions, and their decision is final (absent fraud, a Nevada Board of Directors’ decision concerning financial matters/arrangements is conclusive and neither void nor voidable);

    • No Franchise Tax on Income;

    • No Inheritance or Gift Tax;

    • No Unitary Tax;

    • No Estate Tax;

    • Competitive Sales and Property Tax Rates;

    • Minimal Employer Payroll Tax – 0.7% of gross wages with deductions for employer paid health insurance; and

    • Nevada’s Business Court – Developed on the Delaware model, the Business Court in Nevada minimizes the time, cost and risks of commercial litigation by:

      • Early, comprehensive case management;

      • Active judicial participation in the settlement process;

      • Priority for hearing settings to avoid business disruption; and

      • Predictability of legal decisions in commercial matters.

    • LEGAL DISCLAIMER: Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

    • v2.10072011

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Why Form a Corporate Entity?

DO YOU REALLY THINK THAT YOU HAVE NOTHING TO HIDE?

THINK AGAIN

THE BEST WAY TO AVOID BEING AN EASY TARGET FOR A LAWSUIT, IS TO NEVER MAINTAIN RECOVERABLE ASSETS IN PLAIN SIGHT. [1] [2]

THE HOW & WHY –

We live in an extremely litigious society. The chances of one of us becoming the target of a lawsuit is extremely high. Americans have a 1-in-4 chance of having a potentially devastating lawsuit filed against them. [3]

ASSET PRIVACY & PROTECTION –

Keep your wealth as insulated as you possibly can for privacy and asset protection. Even though most private arrangements are offshore, you can achieve a surprising degree of financial privacy and protection by properly configuring your domestic assets.

THE BEST REASON TO FORM A CORPORATE ENTITY IS TO AVOID BEING AN EASY TARGET FOR A LAWSUIT –

Much like a burglar sizes up potential targets to burglarize, looking for residences that are unlocked, unprotected (no bullet-proof vest or alarm system); or those that are unoccupied (no one at home); litigation seeks out the weak and unprotected. Simply put – an easy target. The process is a simple risk/reward analysis.

The world of litigation is no different (attorneys are just a slightly higher caliber thief). They look for easy targets, or at a minimum, targets that present with a high potential for reward. Again – a risk/cost/reward analysis.

When lawyers size you up to determine whether or not to file a lawsuit on behalf of a prospective client, the most important thing that they want to discover is – whether you have recoverable assets? Simply put, “Am I going to get rewarded/paid for my efforts to prosecute a lawsuit against this individual?

IN VIRTUALLY ALL CASES –  NO RECOVERABLE ASSETS TRANSLATES TO NO LAWSUIT FILED.

This is especially true if the litigation involves a contingency based fee (paid only out of the proceeds recovered from the target of the proposed litigation, and only if the litigation is successful).


[1] Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

[2] John D. Rockefeller once said: “Own Nothing, Control Everything

[3] There are currently between 80 and 90 million lawsuits filed in this country each year. That is over 150 lawsuits per minute. Over 70% of the world’s lawyers reside right here in the USA; and we are adding new lawyers at a rate of 50,000 per year.

Unfortunately there is no way to completely avoid the possibility of being sued. There is, however, a way to reduce the risk of a devastating lawsuit; and to protect yourself should a lawsuit be filed against you. What you need to do is to arrange your affairs so that any activity that could create the potential for a lawsuit is transacted in a manner that will not affect your personal assets. Whether the activity is an operating business, rental property, high profile poker wealth, or any other “risk” operation, you need to separate yourself from those operations through corporate entities (Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof).

If you do not own anything, or if it appears that you do not own anything, no lawyer will sue you unless someone is willing to pay their exorbitant hourly fees and roll the dice. If, on the other hand, the lawyer discovers substantial assets, he may very well take the case against you on a contingency basis. Attorney’s contingency fees in the US currently run in excess of 10 billion dollars per year.

Ever wonder why most legal firm names are followed by PS, PLLP, LLP, LLC or something similar? Lawyers know how to protect themselves and their assets. You can, and should do the same.

The best way to protect your personal assets in our highly litigious society, is to form a legal entity that is separate and distinct from yourself (a virtual bullet-proof vest). This legal entity can be in the form of a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust, or some combination thereof. Be mindful of the fact that, in order for a corporate entity to provide the protection you seek, it must be properly set up and operated. Additionally, the corporate entity type must fit your particular circumstance. When set up and operated properly, your corporate entity will not only provide the protection you seek (a virtual bullet-proof vest), it will pay for itself many times over in the form of fringe benefits and tax savings. It is the best insurance that you will ever purchase – bar none.

v2.10072011

 The Faces that Make TEAM5poker Special

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How Do I Cause My Assets to be Less Recoverable?

FOUR WAYS TO INSURE THAT YOUR ASSETS ARE LESS RECOVERABLE:

(1)   Do not bank in the State in which you live, or that has a presence in the State in which you reside;

(2)   Do not possess a safe deposit box with a Bank in the State in which you reside;

(3)   Create a structure to house and protect your wealth (a Corporate Entity in the form of a Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof); and

(4)   Transfer ownership of your assets to your protection vehicle/Corporate Entity (Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof) . [1]


[1] Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

v2.10072011

 The Faces that Make TEAM5poker Special

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What Are My Best Asset Protection Strategies?

MULTIPLE LINES OF DEFENSE TO PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY AND YOUR ASSETS, ARE YOUR BEST STRATEGY:

(1)   The first line of defense is to keep your assets (Bank accounts, securities accounts, etc.) in another State, and to avoid having a local Bank safety deposit box;

(2)   The second line of defense is to keep your assets out of your name; preferably in the name of a corporate entity that provides asset protection (Corporation, Limited Liability Company, Limited Partnership, Trust or some combination thereof) [1]; and

(3)   The third and most extreme line of defense, is to park your assets offshore.

These strategies provide a high level of protection, but they are not iron-clad.

THE TIME TO ACT TO PROTECT YOUR ASSETS IS BEFORE YOU BECOME THE TARGET OF LITIGATION.

DON’T BE AN EASY TARGET FOR A LAWSUIT – NEVER MAINTAIN RECOVERABLE ASSETS IN PLAIN SIGHT. [2]


[1] Financial and legal experts agree that the two best States to form your corporate entity in are Nevada and Wyoming, because they provide protection almost equal to that of offshore corporate entities (and they incur far less scrutiny from the IRS than do offshore corporate entities). Why? The answer is simple: ownership interest is concealed in both Nevada and Wyoming corporate entities for the fact that they allow BEARER SHARES (anonymous ownership). The result: unless you physically possess the corporate shares, you can truthfully deny any ownership interest in the corporation. Additionally, NEVADA CORPORATIONS/LLC’S – are: (1) tax free; (2) do not share information with the IRS; (3) incur no franchise tax liability; (4) have no extensive annual disclosure requirements (only a current list of stock holders and shares held in bearer form with anonymous ownership is required); and (5) provide broader indemnities for corporate officers – for the fact that absent fraud, a Nevada Board of Directors’ decisions concerning financial matters/arrangements is considered to be conclusive and neither void nor voidable in the eyes of the law.

[2] Nothing contained herein should be deemed or construed to be legal advice. Lucas Lucas, LLC is not a law firm and does not provide legal advice. For that reason, nothing contained herein is intended to take the place of sound legal and financial counsel. The subject matter contained herein is presented strictly for informational purposes only. After considering the subject matter contained herein, it is always best to seek sage legal and financial advice prior to undertaking asset protection strategies.

v2.10072011

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Official NFL Licensed Products (2)

What is a Koozie?

‘Koozie’ [koo-zee] – noun: A Koozie is a neoprene, fabric or foam device that is designed to keep your beverage in your bottle and/or can cold (or hot) while keeping your hand at a normal temperature. Think of a Koozie like a jacket for your beverage that maintains it at the desired temperature. Your very own portable insulation device.

-Synonyms: koozie, cozy, koozy, coolie, beer hugger, can cooler, huggie, cozie, coozie

v1.08022011

 T5   We Have Only Just Begun

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What is the Story/History Behind the NFL Challenge Coins?

NFL CHALLENGE COINS AS POKER CARD PROTECTORS + THE WWI TRADITION

The NFL Challenge Coin is 1 & 3/4″ in diameter and made of die-cast pewter with colored enamel poured by hand and baked to harden. Due to their size and weight, the challenge coins make great poker card protectors. They are larger and heavier than a poker chip.

Each Challenge Coin is two-sidedsee below for a sample of the front and the back:

THE TRADITION

Like so many other aspects of military tradition, the origins of the challenge coin are a matter of significant debate with little in the way of supporting evidence. While many organizations and services claim to have been the originators of the challenge coin, the most commonly held view is that the tradition began in the United States Army Air Service (forerunner to the United States Air Force).

Air warfare was a new phenomenon during World War I, when the army created flying squadrons and manned them with volunteer pilots from every walk of civilian life. While some of the early pilots came from working class or rural backgrounds, many were wealthy Ivy League students who withdrew from classes in the middle of the year, drawn by the adventure and romance of the new form of warfare.

As the legend goes, one such Ivy League wealthy lieutenant, ordered small, solid-bronze medallions (or coins) struck, which he then presented to the other pilots in his squadron as mementos of their service together. The coins were gold-plated, bore the squadron’s insignia, and were quite valuable. One of the pilots in the squadron, who had never owned anything like the coin, placed it in a leather pouch he wore around his neck for safekeeping. A short while later, this pilot’s aircraft was heavily damaged by ground fire (other sources claim it was an aerial dogfight), forcing him to land behind enemy lines and allowing him to be captured by the Germans. The Germans confiscated the personal belongings from his pockets, but they didn’t catch the leather pouch around his neck. On his way to a permanent prisoner of war facility, he was held overnight in a small German-held French village near the front. During the night, the town was bombarded by the British, creating enough confusion to allow the pilot to escape.

The pilot avoided German patrols by donning civilian attire, but all of his identification had been confiscated so he had no way to prove his identity. With great difficulty, he snuck across no-man’s land and made contact with a French patrol. Unfortunately for him, the French had been on the lookout for German saboteurs dressed as civilians. The French mistook the American pilot for a German saboteur and immediately prepared to execute him.

Desperate to prove his allegiance and without any identification, the pilot pulled out the coin from his leather pouch and showed it to his French captors. One of the Frenchmen recognized the unit insignia on the coin and delayed the execution long enough to confirm the pilot’s identity.

Once the pilot safely returned to his squadron, it became a tradition for all members to carry their coin at all times. To ensure compliance, the pilots would challenge each other to produce the coin. If the challenged couldn’t produce the coin, he was required to buy a drink of choice for the challenger; if the challenged could produce the coin, the challenger would purchase the drink.

This tradition spread to other flying squadrons and, eventually, to other military units in all branches of service and even to non-military organizations. Today, challenge coins are given to members upon joining an organization, as an award to improve morale, and sold to commemorate special occasions.

President Bill Clinton displayed several racks of challenge coins, which had been given to him by U.S. service members, on the credenza behind his Oval Office desk. The challenge coins appear in the background of his official portrait, now hanging in the White House.

CHALLENGING

The tradition of a challenge is the most common way to ensure that members are carrying their unit’s coin. The challenge, which can be held at any time, begins with the challenger drawing his/her coin, and slapping or placing the coin on the table or bar (NOTE: If the coin be accidentally dropped, the challenge is still valid). Everyone being challenged must immediately produce the coin for their organization and anyone failing to do so must buy a round of drinks for the challenger and everyone else who has their challenge coin in their possession. In the event that everyone challenged is able to produce their coin, the challenger must buy a round of drinks for the entire group. If you are able to steal a challenge coin everyone in the group must buy you a drink. During a challenge everyone in the group must buy you a drink if you are the holder of the highest ranking coin.

You can purchase the entire collection of NFL Challenge Coins for your favorite NFL team(s) on the TEAM5 website. Enjoy!

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Poker (13)

What Are the Poker Hand Rankings?

Poker Hand Rankings

Royal Flush

The highest hand in poker, the royal flush is a poker hand which contains the A,K,Q,J and 10, all of the same suit.

Straight Flush

A straight flush is a poker hand which contains five cards in sequence, all of the same suit. Two such hands are compared by their high card in the same way as are straights (the low ace rule also applies).

Four-of-a-Kind

Four-of-a-kind, also known as quads, is a poker hand which contains four cards of one rank, and an unmatched card. It ranks above a full house and below a straight flush. Higher ranking quads defeat lower ranking ones. Between two equal sets of four of a kind (possible in wild card and community card games), the kicker determines the winner.

Full House

A full house, also known as a ‘boat‘ or a ‘full boat‘, is a poker hand which contains three matching cards of one rank, plus two matching cards of another rank. It ranks below a four of a kind and above a flush. Between two full houses, the one with the higher ranking set of three wins. If two have the same set of three (possible in wild card and community card games), the hand with the higher pair wins. Full houses are described by the three of a kind (e.g. K-K-K) and pair (e.g. 9-9), as in “kings over nines” (also used to describe a two pair), “Kings full of nines” or simply “Kings full”.

Flush

A flush is a poker hand which contains five cards of the same suit, not in rank sequence. It ranks above a straight and below a full house. Two flushes are compared as if they were high card hands. In other words, the highest ranking card of each is compared to determine the winner; if both have the same high card, then the second-highest ranking card is compared, and so on. The suits have no value: two flushes with the same five ranks of cards are tied. Flushes are described by the highest card in the hand, as in “king-high flush”.

Straight

A straight is a poker hand which contains five cards of sequential rank, consisting of varying suits. It ranks above three-of-a-kind and below a flush. Two straights are ranked by comparing the high card in each hand. Two straights with the same high card are of equal value, and split any winnings (straights are the most commonly tied hands in poker, especially in community card games). Straights are described by the highest card, as in “king-high straight” or “straight to the king”.

A hand such as A,K,Q,J,10 is an ace-high straight, and ranks above a king-high straight such as K,Q,J,10,9. But the ace may also be played as a 1-spot in a hand such as 5,4,3,2,A, called a wheel or five-high straight, which ranks below the six-high straight 6,5,4,3,2. The ace may not “wrap around”, or play both high and low in the same hand: 3,2,A,K,Q.

Three-of-a-kind

Three-of-a-kind, also called trips, or set, is a poker hand which contains three cards of the same rank, plus two unmatched cards. It ranks above two pair and below a straight. Higher ranking three of a kind defeat lower ranking three of a kinds. If two hands have the same rank three of a kind (possible in games with wild cards or community cards), the kickers are compared to break the tie.

Two Pair

A poker hand which contains two cards of the same rank, plus two cards of another rank (that match each other but not the first pair), plus one unmatched card, is called two pair. It ranks above one pair and below three of a kind. Between two hands containing two pair, the higher ranking pair of each is first compared, and the higher pair wins. If both have the same top pair, then the second pair of each is compared. Finally, if both hands have the same two pairs, the kicker determines the winner. Two pair are described by the higher pair, as in “Kings over trey” or simply “Kings up”.

Pair

One pair is a poker hand which contains two cards of the same rank, plus three unmatched cards. It ranks above any high card hand, but below all other poker hands. Higher ranking pairs defeat lower ranking pairs. If two hands have the same rank of pair, the non-paired cards in each hand (the kickers) are compared to determine the winner.

High Card

A high-card or no-pair hand is a poker hand in which no two cards have the same rank (number or letter), the five cards are not in sequence, and the five cards are not all of the same suit. It ranks below all other poker hands. Two such hands are ranked by comparing the highest ranking card; if those are equal, then the next highest ranking card; if those are equal, then the third highest ranking card, and so on. No-pair hands are described by the one or two highest cards in the hand, such as “ace high” or “ace-king high”, or by as many cards as are necessary to break a tie.

v20_02.25.2011

What is the History and Some of the Factoids for the 2011 WSOP?

The World Series of Poker (WSOP©) is a world renown poker event consisting of 58 separate bracelet events held annually in Las Vegas, NV (sponsored by Caesar’s Entertainment).

2011 WSOP© FACTOIDS:

FIRST YEAR OF THE WSOP©: 1970 (In the beginning, Benny Binion invited seven of the best-known poker players to the Horseshoe Casino, in Las Vegas, NV);

NUMBER OF NATIONS REPRESENTED IN THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENT: 85;

THE 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE: Bou-Nahra, Collins, Giannetti, Heinz, Holden, Lamb, Makiievskyi, O’Dea and Staszko;

OLDEST 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE PLAYER: Badih Bou-Nahra (49-years-old);

YOUNGEST 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE PLAYER: Anton Makiievskyi (21-years-old and he has the chance to become the youngest Main Event champion in the WSOP’s 42-year history);

NUMBER OF NATIONS REPRESENTED BY THE 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE:  7 (the most in the 42-year history of the event);

TOTAL NUMBER OF ENTRANTS IN THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENT:  6,865; and

THE AMOUNT OF THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENT FIRST PLACE PRIZE: $8,711,956 or approximately $8.7M.

THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENTBY THE NUMBERS:

1 – The number of players winning two bracelets this year;

12 – The number of bracelet winners in 2011 whose first WSOP© cash, was a bracelet win;

44 – The number of professional poker players who won WSOP© bracelets this year;

55 The number of ESPN cameras used to capture the 2011 WSOP© Main Event action;

105 – The total number of countries represented at this year’s WSOP©;

416,000 – The average number of viewers watching the live WSOP© Main Event coverage. The two hours of coverage on ESPN drew 646,000 viewers, representing double-digit increases over last year’s ESPN coverage of the WSOP©; and

$4,119,000 – The total dollar value of the rake taken by the WSOP© on the 2011 Main Event (rake: fees collected by the house) (more money than 3rd place will earn in November).

WORLD SERIES of POKER© – MAIN EVENT HISTORY

(2000 thru 2011)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v20.02022012

 

What is Position Play?

PLAYING POSITION

POSITION: Position is one of the most basic rudimentary concepts in all of poker; and it is a very important concept to understand as a beginning poker player. Poker is played around a table usually with 9-10 other players (Stud games are played 8-handed). The dealer button is ground zero for the deal for the hand in question. That is the perspective from which the hand is dealt. If you are to the immediate left of the button, you are the small blind and the ’first to act’ in subsequent betting rounds to the pre-flop betting. In the first round, since you have posted a blind, you act second to last and can opt to call or raise, for the fact that you have but one-half of the big blind committed to the pot. The big blind is to your immediate left. The big blind acts last in the pre-flop betting action, but the big blind (hereinafter SB and BB respectively) has an option to raise in the pre-flop action, if no one other player has raised his big blind.

Think of the button again as the focal point of the action and remember that it rotates clockwise (changes or progresses) every hand. This POSITION gets to act last in each betting round. This is a very powerful advantage in the game of poker. The action starts with the player to the left of the button. As players decide to bet, call, raise, or fold, the player on the button has the advantage of seeing the action of all the other players before he is required to make any decisions. (EXAMPLE: You have a pair of sevens (7-7) in your hand. There has been a bet, a raise, and two calls when it gets around to you. It is safe to say that your sevens have shrunk up a bit and right now you probably do not have the best hand. If the raise was a large one, you should likely fold. This is not information that the person to your left, in the SB position had when they originally opened the betting. When the action gets back to that person, they have the choice of folding their investment in the pot, or calling (or re-raising) the raise. You do not have that burden. Your decision can be made with zero investment in the pot at this point. Compared to the player in the small blind, you are buying a stock today knowing exactly what the price is tomorrow. You have insider information and a big advantage because of your position at the table).

As the last player to act, you can also opt to close the betting by calling. No one can raise or re-raise unless you re-open the betting by raising the bet when the action comes to you. Other players have the ability to raise and re-raise, but when it gets to you, you can close the betting.

v2.03222014

What is Relative Hand Strength?

RELATIVE HAND STRENGTH: With position in mind, consider your relative hand strength. How strong is your hand from a starting cards perspective? The best two cards that you can look down to see obviously is a pair of aces. However, that is only going to happen once every approximate 220 hands, on average. The worst two cards that you can look down and see pre-flop is 7-2 off-suit. So if A-A and 7-2 off-suit are the extremes, what hands should you play? The answer is most often ‘that depends’. Should you play a middle pair from early position? That is up to you and depends on your unique style of play. Having that same middle pair in late position with a number of players having folded, is a much better situation than having that hand as ‘the first to act.’ A pair of aces against a full table of players wins just under half of the time (assuming that everyone kept their cards for the purpose of this example), but against only one other player it wins better than 4 out of 5 times, on average. So, if you end up with A-A or a strong hand, the odds of winning the pot with that hand increase relative to the number of opponents you play it against. Therefore, it is always better to ‘thin the field’ and ‘protect your hand’ and use position to your advantage.

Understanding the concept of ‘less is more’ in terms of number of opponents is an important concept to grasp. When you have a good hand, isolate. Isolating your opponents and paring down the field improves your chances of dragging the pot your way – more often than not.

v1.08022011

What are Outs?

OUTS:Three strikes, you’re out’ is a common baseball term. Three outs and an inning is over in a baseball game. In poker, an ‘out’ is used to refer to the remaining number of cards in the deck that will make or complete your hand. For example, let’s say that you have KsQs in your hand and the board is Ts-4s-Ad. You need another spade to hit a flush. How many spades are there left in the deck? Well, there are 13 of every suit, right? You have two spades in your hand with two of them on the board. So, of the known cards, (your pocket cards and the community cards) four of them are spades. That means that you can estimate that there are 9 additional spades remaining in the deck. Now, players could have folded their pocket spades, thereby making them unavailable for you to hit them on the turn card or river card, however we have now way of knowing that with certainty. So, we will keep it simple and estimate that there are 9 spades ‘somewhere’ in the deck. Knowing that there are nine spades left, those spades are what we refer to as our ‘outs’. Our opponent is betting and we are calling, hoping that we hit one of those remaining spades. We have now way of ascertaining what our opponent’s hand is of course, but through his actions we will put him on a hand, that is to say, we will mentally assume he has a specific hand. Based on what he has done, let’s say we deduce that he likely has at least an ace in his hand. So he has at least a pair-of-aces as his hand. We know that we are drawing and assume that we need to hit one of our spade outs to beat him (we have other ways to win, but for this example we will explore only hitting our flush). How many cards are in the deck in total? 52. And again, we know what 5 of them are after the flop. After the turn, we will know what 6 of them are (two in the pocket and the board four community cards). So, before the turn card, what are our chances of hitting a spade? Well, on the turn it would be 9 of the 46 unknowns. 9/46 is .1956. So our chances are 9 in 46, or roughly just under 20%. If we stuck around for the river card, we would have an additional shot of 9/45. It might get costly to call though as our opponent will bet to get rid of us and try to ‘take-it-down‘ right there. Unless you have ‘the nuts’ (the best possible hand) then you do not want to give opponents a chance to draw out on you. In this case, the opponent would not want us to hit one of those 9 spades. If he is a skilled player, he will recognize the possibilities and bet enough to insure that we never see the cards to come.

There is actually a simple way to calculate a reasonable approximation of your odds of making that flush, or whatever hand the case may be. It is called ‘the rule of 2 and 4’ (explained under separate FAQ title).

v2.03222014

What is the Rule of 2 & 4?

THE RULE OF 2 AND 4: Now that we understand how to determine our number of outs, we can further explore ‘the rule of 2 and 4.’ In the case of our flush draw, we have 9 outs.

The rule of 2 and 4’ works like this:

With the turn and river still to come, we have 2 chances to hit one of our 9 outs. It is just under 20% in terms of our chance to hit our flush with one attempt (river only); and with two attempts (turn & river) our odds increase to about 35%.  Here is the ‘rule of 2 and 4‘ calculation: With nine outs, on the turn we take our outs and multiply by 4 (4 x 9 = 36, or approximately 36%). That is a close estimation of the actual 35% odds of hitting our flush with the turn and river to come. With only the river to come, we multiply by 2 (9 x 2= 18, or approximately 18%). Those are both very close approximations of the actual probability figures. This is a quick-and-easy way to estimate our odds and decide if it is worth paying to see the cards that are yet to come on the ‘turn‘ and ‘river‘.

The remaining factor in the decision making process worthy of consideration is, ‘How much money is in the pot?’ Why is this important you ask? It is important because if you do not have reasonable ‘pot odds‘, you should not call the bet. ‘Pot odds‘ are further explained under separate title in the FAQ’s.

v2.03222014

What are Pot Odds?

POT ODDS: Now that we know how to calculate outs and figure out the chances or odds of hitting the required cards to make (complete) our hand, we will shift focus to examining the size of the pot. For example, if there is $100 in the pot, we are faced with the flush draw situation that we just explored and we figure our opponent has a straight. Therefore, we need to hit our flush in order to win the pot. Our opponent bets $50. That means there is $150 in the pot now and we have to call $50 to win that amount. $50 to win $150 translates to 3-to-1 odds. Again, what are the chances of hitting our flush in terms of percentage? About 19%, based upon our gouge (‘rule of thumb‘) ‘rule of 2 and 4‘ calculations for a single card draw. However, if we remained in the hand all the way to the river and had yet another chance at hitting or completing our hand – that would translate to roughly 36%. 36% is slightly better than 2-to-1 odds (33.333% being 2:1 of course). So we can deduce that we are getting paid 3-to-1 on a 2-to-1 draw. Sound reasonable? Yes, it is. But as we deduced above, the answer to anything in poker is often ‘it depends’. It is good if our opponent has all of his money committed to the pot and we are not on-the-hook for another round of betting (which would make it even more expensive for us to call on the river). Prior to acting on your calculations, consider how situations like this are likely to play out before you commit yourself to getting involved in a process that it not yet complete. Think it all the way through.

There is another way to view odds that can be even more interesting. With pot odds we are assuming no more money is going to be placed into that pot when we calculate the percentages. What if we had some disguised hand that our opponent was not likely to put us on? We might call a long-odds draw in a situation where we believe that we will win the pot, AND ALL OF THE OTHER PLAYERS CHIPS (THEIR ENTIRE STACK) – if we hit our draw. These are what are called ‘implied odds’ and are discussed under a different title in the FAQ’s.

v2.03222014

What are Implied Odds?

IMPLIED ODDS: In our example above, we were getting paid 3-to-1 on a 2-to-1 draw chance. We concluded that was good. But what if our opponent had $8,500 additional chips in his stack? What if the situation was a straight flush draw and not just a flush draw and we think our opponent has trips or something strong that he would call with? Maybe we think he has the Ace high or nut flush. We would win if we hit our draw and the straight flush. The pot may have insufficient odds in it to make us think about calling assuming he has the best hand right now. However, in some situations, we have to consider the possibility that if we hit our miracle card, we would also get a call from the player for an all-in bet we would make thereafter. That makes the odds a lot bigger than just what is just in the pot. Whereas above we had a situation where we had to call $50 to win $150, if we hit an open ended straight flush draw and we concluded that we would get an all-in call from our opponent because he has hit his ace high or nut flush. We would have to take our opponents $8,500 remaining chips into account as we calculate our odds. Now we would be getting a lot more than just 3-to-1 if we hit our miracle card. These are what are referred to as ‘implied odds.’

v2.03222014

What Does Position Play Look Like Graphically?

 

Dealer or Button:
This is the most desirable position at the poker table, since the player in that position is the last to act on the flop, turn, and river.

Under the Gun (“UTG”)
This player is to the left of the big blind and the first player to act pre-flop (considered to be the worst position in Texas Hold’em, but a player under the gun will actually have a better position post-flop than either the small or big blind).

Big Blind (“BB”)
This is the player to the left of the small blind (unless the game is heads-up).

Small Blind (“SB”)
This player is directly to the left of the button unless the game is heads-up.

Cutoff
This is the player to the right of the button. It is called the cutoff because that position often “cuts off” the dealer’s ability to steal blinds by betting.

Hijack
This is the player to the right of the cutoff. At full table it functions a lot like the cutoff position.

Heads-Up Exception
When play is heads-up, the player on the button is the small blind and the other player is the big blind. When heads-up play commences, the only exception to normal button rotation accounts for the fact that no player can be the big blind twice consecutively; therefore the button is positioned in heads-up play accordingly (occasionally contradicting the normal clockwise rotation).

NOTES

(1) Position is also described in terms of ‘early position‘, ‘middle position‘, and ‘late position‘. These terms are often abbreviated ‘EP‘, ‘MP‘, and ‘LP‘.

(2) Players in ‘early position‘ are some of the first to act in a betting round, like the player who is under the gun.

(3) ‘Late position‘ players are some of the last to act in a betting round, like the cutoff seat and the player on the button; and

(4)Middle position‘ is all positions in-between early and late.

v2.03222014

What Poker Terms Should I Be Familiar With?

Ace-High - A five-card-hand containing only an Ace (as a high card); and no pair, straight or flush.

Aces Full – A full-house consisting of three aces and any pair.

Aces Up - A hand containing two pairs, one of which is an Ace.

Action - A game in which players are playing a lot of pots is considered an ‘action’ game.

Active Player - A player who still remains in the hand.

Aggressive Player - A player who bets, raises, and re-raises frequently.

Air - A very weak hand.

All-In - The moment when you commit all of your chips to the pot.

American Airlines - Having a pair of Aces as your hole cards (AA).

Angling - Taking action or talking when it is not your turn in order to mislead your opponents. Some consider this to be cheating; others consider these tactics to be part of the game.

Animal - A nickname for a player that is loose-aggressive. Animals are involved in too many hands and will almost always bet and raise whenever the opportunity presents, often with a garbage hand (also referred to as a ‘maniac’).

Ante - A term used in poker to refer to the first money wagered on a hand, or the minimum that each player is required to put into the pot before a new hand can begin.

Baby - A low-ranked card (usually 2 through 5).

Back Door - A draw that requires two cards to complete a straight, flush, or full house (Example: to complete a flush the correct suit must hit on the turn and the river).

Backdoor Flush - A hand with three cards that would support a flush, but needs the remaining turn and river cards to complete the hand.

Backdoor Straight Flush - A hand with three cards supporting a straight flush, but requires the remaining turn and river cards to complete the hand.

Bad Beat - This refers to losing a hand when you were the odds on favorite to win the hand (Example: An example of a bad beat would be holding pocket Aces against a player holding pocket 9’s, and your opponent ends up winning the hand by spiking one of the remaining 9’s in the deck on the river).

Bad Beat Jackpot - A reward or promotion in which the card room or casino offers a jackpot to a player who has lost with a really big hand (usually Aces full or better).

Bankroll - The amount of money you have available with which to play poker over a particular period of time.

Behind - A player at the table who acts after or ‘behind’ you.

Belly-Buster - This is also known as an inside straight draw or gut shot.

Best of It - To be the favorite to win the hand.

Bet - To commit money to the pot.

Bet the Pot - When a player bets the amount of the pot (a valid bet in certain types of games).

Big Blind - The position two to the left of the button, who is forced to pay a full small bet prior to the hole cards being dealt in Texas Hold’em.

Big Slick - Refers to holding an Ace and King as your two private hole cards.

Big Sister - Refers to holding an Ace and Queen as your two pocket cards.

Blank - A card that appears useless (also known as a ‘rag’ or a ‘brick’).

Blinds - Texas Hold’em Poker uses what’s called a ‘blind’ structure, meaning that two people on the table must post a bet prior to seeing their hole cards. Since they are forced to bet without seeing their hole cards, they are playing ‘blind’, thus the name of those bets are called ‘blinds’. There are two blinds, the big blind and the small blind. The small blind position must post half the minimum bet and sits immediately to the left of the dealer. The big blind must post the full minimum bet, and sits immediately to the left of the small blind, two seats to the left of the dealer. As the dealer button rotates around the table, each player takes turns posting the small blind and the big blind bets. This blind structure forces the action on the table since there will always be a pot to win (Example: if you are seated at a $5-10 limit Hold’em table, the small blind must post $5 and the big blind must post $10 bet. As play rotates around the table, each player may choose to call that $10 bet, raise, or fold. When it’s the small blind’s turn, that player is only required to call $5 to play the hand).

Blind Raise – When a player raises without looking at his hand.

Bluff - To bet with an inferior hand in the hope that players will fold and you can take down the pot.

Board - The board refers to the community cards that are dealt face up on the table. In Texas Hold’em, there will ultimately be five community cards on the ‘board’. The board does not include the two private or hole cards dealt to each player (Note: ‘the board plays’ means that the player is stating that the five community cards comprise his best poker hand, and he is not using any of the two private or hole cards dealt to him in order to make his best hand).

Boat - Full House.

Bottom Pair - Making a pair containing the lowest cards on the board.

Broadway - An Ace-high straight (A-K-Q-J-10).

Bubble – The point in a tournament at which only one player must bust out before all others win some money. It is also the person who was unfortunate enough to finish in that position.

Bullets - A pair of Aces (AA).

Bump It - To raise.

Burn Card - Any card placed in the discard rack without being entered into play. After the deck is shuffled and cut, one card is ‘burned.’

Button - A player who is in the designated dealer position. Also called the ‘dealer button’, this is a white puck (usually with the word ‘dealer’ inscribed on it), that signifies the dealer’s position on the table. The dealer’s position is significant because he is the last player to act for that hand. The dealer button rotates around the table, moving a seat left after each hand, so that each player takes turns being ‘on the button’.

Buy-In - The minimum amount of money required to enter any game or tournament, usually five times the maximum bet in a cash game.

Cage - A cashier window located in a casino where chip or money transactions take place (the casino version of a bank).

Call - To place an amount of money equal to a previous players bet.

Calling Station - A player who only calls bets and does not take advantage of their good hands by raising. They also will not fold very often, so you should not bluff them but you need to show down the best hand.

Capped - Describes the situation in limit poker in which the maximum number of raises in the betting round has been reached.

Card Room - The room or area in the casino where poker is played or conducted.

Cards Speak - The face value of a h and in a showdown is the true value of the hand, regardless of a verbal announcement.

Cash Out - To leave the game and convert your chips to cash.

Check - To decline to bet or to pass, when it is your turn to act (the action is on you); however the player retains the right to to act if another player initiates the betting.

Check-and-Raise - The act of checking a hand, in hopes of luring the other player to bet, so that you may then raise over the top of him and build a larger pot to win (also known as check-raise).

Cheques - Chips.

Clock - An expression wherein a player in the hand request the floor person (floor man) to limit the amount of time a player can take to act on his hand. Normally, the floor person gives the player (once it is determined that he has had adequate time to act on his hand) one-minute to act (providing a 10-second warning to the expiration of time)].

Chop - To return the blinds to the players who posted them and move on to the next hand if no other players call. It can also mean to ‘split the pot’.

Collection - The ‘rent‘ paid every half-hour for a seat in a poker game (most often in a time game without an individual per hand rake by the house).

Collection Drop - A fee for each hand dealt paid to the house.

Collusion - When two or more players conspire to cheat in a poker game.

Color Change - A request by a player to change the chips from one denomination to another (also known as color-up).

Community Cards - Cards placed in the middle of the table and shared by all players in Texas Hold’em and Omaha (flop, turn & river).

Connectors - A starting hand of two cards in sequence, such as Q-J, 6-7, or 9-10 (or similar sequential cards).

Cowboys - Two Kings.

Cut - To divide the deck into two sections in such a manner as to change the order of the cards.

Cut Card - Another term for the bottom card or security card (usually plastic consisting of a solid color and sized identically to the cards in play).

Dead Man’s Hand - Two pair consisting of Aces and Eights (Wild Bill Hickok was shot in the back while playing this hand and that incident is the genesis of the naming of this particular hand).

Deuces - A pair of 2’s.

Donkey - Someone who is a bad poker player.

Doyle Brunson - A Hold’em hand consisting of a 10-2 (Doyle Brunson won the world championship two years in a row on the final hand with these cards).

Drawing Dead - Drawing to a hand that, even if it improves, will lose to a made hand that is already superior.

Drop - Fold.

Ducks - A pair of 2’s.

Equity - Your mathematical share of the pot and your chances of winning it.

Expected Value (EV) - The average amount that you will win when betting in the same situation numerous times.

Face Cards - The King, Queen or Jack of each suit.

Family Pot - When everyone at the table has entered the pot.

Favorite - To be a favorite, you have the best chance to win the current hand in play.

Fifth Street - Also known as the ‘river’ card. In flop games, this represents the fifth community card on the table and the final round of betting.

Fill Up - To make a Full House from trips or a set.

Fish - A loose player who loses his or her money regularly.

Flash - To show one or more of your cards, usually when it is not required to do so (also known as a flashed card).

Flat Call - Calling a bet without raising the bet (also known as ‘flatting’).

Floor Person - A card room supervisory employee who seats players, balances tables, and renders decisions and rulings that are most often considered to be final (also known as a floor man).

Flop - In Texas Hold’em, each player has two cards dealt to them, and then shares five community cards. These five community cards, however, do not get dealt at the same time. There are rounds of betting at certain intervals during the deal of the cards. After the first two cards are dealt to each player, there is a round of betting. Then, three of the five community cards are dealt at one time on the board. This is what is known as the ‘flop’ – the first three cards being dealt on the board. The fourth card dealt is called the ‘turn’, and the fifth and final card is known as the ‘river’.

Fold - To throw a hand away and relinquish all interest in the pot.

Flush - Any five cards of the same suit.

Flush Draw - A hand where you have 4 of the 5 cards needed to make a flush. For example, if you are holding two clubs, and the board flops two more clubs, you would be holding a flush draw. You would need to draw an additional club to complete the flush.

Fold - To discard your hand when it is your turn to act (also known as mucking your cards).

Fouled Hand - A dead hand.

Four of a Kind - Four cards of the same number or face value (‘quads’).

Four-Flushed - Having four flush cards in your hand, or on the board (when you have two of the four flush cards in your hand with two additional flush cards on the board, your odds of completing your flush with the use of the turn or river cards are approximately 35%).

Fourth Street - In flop games, it is the fourth community card dealt (also known as ‘the turn’) and initiates the third round of betting.

Free Card - A round in which no player bets.

Free Card Play - Betting or raising in late position on the flop in the hopes that the other players will check to you on the turn, giving you the option of seeing the river card for free.

Free Ride - A round in which no one bets (also known as getting a ‘free card’).

Full House - Any three cards of the same number or face value, plus any other two cards of the same number or face value in combination (also known as a hand with three-of-a-kind and a pair).

Gut Shot - A hand where you have 4 of the 5 cards needed to make a straight, but your 4 cards are not ‘connected’ or in sequential order, so you need a single card in the middle of your straight to complete the straight (Example: You are holding 5-6, and the board shows 7, 9, 10 – at that moment, you have a ‘gut shot’ as only the 8 will complete your straight (also known as an ‘inside straight draw’ or a ‘belly-buster straight draw’).

Gypsy Bet - To open the pot for the size of the big blind.

Hand - The cards in a player’s hand or one game of poker in which a pot is won.

Hit - When the flop cards are helpful to or improve your hand.

Hold ‘em - Also known as Texas Hold ‘em, where the players get two down or hole cards and five community cards.

Hold Up - When a hand that is leading manages to win the pot at the showdown.

Hole Cards - The cards dealt face-down to a player.

Hooks - A pair of Jacks (JJ).

Image - The perception that other players at the table have of your individual playing style.

Implied Odds - Bets that you can reasonably expect to collect in addition to the bets already in the pot, if you make your hand.

Important Money - Money that is not part of your poker bankroll and which should never be committed to a wager or commingled with your poker bankroll (According to Oklahoma Johnny Hale – ‘Never Play Poker with Important Money‘).

In Position - To have position on your opponent is being able to act last post flop (Example: UTG raises and you call on the button and will be in position for the rest of the hand).

Inside Straight - Four cards which require another card between the top and the bottom card to complete a straight.

Inside Straight Draw - Four cards which require another card between the top and the bottom card to complete a straight. Also known as a ‘belly-buster straight draw,’ or ‘gut shot straight draw’.

In Turn –  A term describing when it is permissible for a player to act.

Keep Them Honest - To call at the end of a hand to prevent someone from bluffing.

Key Card - A card that provides a big draw, or makes your hand.

Key Hand - In a session it is the one hand that ends up being a turning point for the player, either for the better or worse.

Kicker - The kicker refers to your tie-breaking card (Example: holding an Ace and King, and the board shows Ace, 5, 7, 2, J – the player would have a pair of Aces with a King kicker).

Kojak - A hand containing a K-J.

Ladies - Two Queens (QQ).

Late Position - The player’s position on a round of betting where the player must act after most of the other players have acted (usually considered to be the two positions next to the button).

Lay Down - When a player folds or mucks his cards.

Lead - The first player to bet into a pot.

Limit - The set amount or amounts that may be bet, often expressed as 5/10 ($5 bets on the first two rounds and $10 bets thereafter).

Limp-In - To come into a hand with a call (rather than a raise) before the flop.

Limper - The first player who calls a bet.

Live Hand - A hand that could still win the pot.

Live One - A player lacking knowledge or experience who plays a lot of hands.

Look - When a player calls the final bet before the show-down.

Loose - To play more hands than advisable.

Main Pot - The center or main pot. Any other bets are placed in a side pot(s) and are contested among remaining players (Example: this occurs when a player(s) goes all-in for less money in the stacks of other players).

Maniac - A very aggressive player who plays a lot of hands.

Middle Pair - To have a pair containing the second highest card on the board.

Middle Position - A location somewhere between early and late positions on a specific round of betting (the fifth, sixth and seventh seats to the left of the button).

Minimum Buy-In - The least amount you can enter a game of poker with.

Miscall An incorrect verbal declaration of the ranking of a hand.

Misdeal - A mistake by the dealer on the dealing of a hand that causes the cards to be reshuffled and a new hand to be dealt.

Monster - A very big hand. In a tournament, a player who begins to accumulate chips after having a small stack is also considered to be a monster.

Muck - To discard a hand (also a term that describes the pile of cards maintained by the dealer containing all cards discarded by players at the table).

No-Limit (NL) - A game where players can bet as much as they like (limited only by the size of their stack) on any round of betting.

Nuts - The best hand possible.

Odds - The probability of making a hand versus the probability of not making a hand.

Off Suit - Cards of differing suits.

Omaha - A game in which each player is dealt four down cards with five community cards. To make your hand, you must play two cards from your hand and three from the board.

Open - To make the first or initial bet on a given round of betting.

Open-Ended Straight - Four consecutive or sequential cards whereby one additional (consecutive or sequential) card is needed at either end to make a straight.

Option - When it is the Big Blind’s turn to act and he has the option of checking or raising the action.

Outs - Cards yet to come that will improve your hand.

Over Card - A card that is higher than other cards, usually in reference to the community cards.

Paint(s) - Face card(s) (Kings; Queens or Jacks).

Pair - Two cards that are the same rank.

Playing the Board - When your best five-card-hand consists of the five cards on the board (Note: The cards on the board are also referred to as ‘community cards’) (also known as using all five community cards as your hand in Hold’em).

Pocket Rockets - Pair of Aces.

Position - Your place in the order of betting action that your seat commands for a particular hand. If you are the first to act first then you are in first position (also known as the order in which you act in a particular hand).

Post - To post a blind so you can enter the hand.

Pot - All the money that has been placed in the middle including all bets, blinds and antes.

Pot Odds - The mathematical computation of the odds of your hand improving, the amount of money in the pot, and the size of the bet that you must call.

Prop - Someone who gets paid by a poker room to play in their games, usually to start games or play in shorthanded games.

Quads - Four of a kind (such as four aces).

Re-Raise - An increase in a wager at least the size of the previous bet which occurs after a raise.

Rake - The house percentage taken from each pot on a per-hand basis (usually 10% to maximum of $4 or $5).

Rags - Weak cards; usually low cards.

Railbird - Someone who is watching a game on the rail.

Raise - To place a higher bet than an opponent has already placed.

Rake - The amount a card room takes from each pot, usually a percentage that has a set upper limit.

Read - An assumption as to what cards a player has.

Re-Raise - To raise after an opponent has raised (also known as two bet).

River - The last remaining community card after which there is one final round of betting.

Rivered - To get beat by a hand that is made on the river.

Rock - This is an extremely tight player at the table.

Round - When the button has moved completely around the table and everyone has had a chance to deal.

‘Rounders’ - A popular poker movie starring Matt Damon.

Royal Flush - The best possible hand, a royal flush is a straight flush involving the Ten, Jack, Queen, King and Ace.

Runner-Runner - To hit both the turn and the river card to make your hand.

Scramble - A face-down mixing of the cards.

Seat Charge - The amount of money some card rooms charge per hour to play in addition to, or in place of, a rake (a time game).

Semi-Bluff - To bet with a hand that may not be the best hand but has a good chance to improve to (or become) the best hand.

Set - Three-of-a-kind (two cards in your hand that match one card on the board) (Note: trips are three-of-a-kind in which one of your hole cards match two cards on the board).

Setup Two suited decks of cards, each with a different color backing, to replace the current decks in play.

Short Buy - A buy-in that is than the required minimum buy-in.

Short Stacked - To possess the smallest stack of chips at the poker table.

Showdown - The final act of determining the winner of the pot after all betting has been completed.

Shuffle - The act by the dealer of randomly mixing the cards before the start of the hand.

Side Pot - An additional pot made when one player is all-in and two or more other players are still involved in the hand.

Small Blind - The amount put in the pot by the person immediately to the left of the dealer ‘button’ prior to the cards being dealt (also known as the smallest blind in a multiple blind game).

Solid - A fairly tight player (a good player).

Speed Limit - A pair of 5’s.

Stay - When a player remains in the game by calling, rather than raising.

Steal - To force the other player to fold when you don’t have the best hand.

Steel Wheel - A five high straight (A-2-3-4-5) of the same suit.

Straddle - A straddle is an additional blind bet which is usually double the size of the big blind (and that player may raise when the action gets to him) in a multiple blind game.

Straight - Five sequential or consecutive cards of any suit.

Straight Flush - Five sequential or consecutive cards of the same suit.

String Bet or Raise - A bet made in more than one motion, without declaration of a raise [Example: the player pushes chips forward (committing them to the pot) and then returns to his stack for additional chips].

Stuck - A player who is losing in a game.

Suited - Cards of the same suit (such as 8 and 9).

Table Stakes - (1) The amount of money that you have in front of you at the table. This is the maximum amount that you can win or lose on any one hand; (2) The requirement that players can wager only the amount of money in front of them at the start of a hand, and can only buy more chips in-between hands.

Tell - An action that a player makes that gives away the strength of their hand.

Texas Hold’em - This is also the name for Hold’em, the most popular form of poker.

The Nuts - The best possible poker hand, based upon a combination of the players hole cards and the board or community cards.

Three of Kind - Three cards of the face value.

Tight - To play fewer hands than normal.

Tilt - When a player is emotionally upset and starts making poor decisions (also known as on-tilt).

‘Time’ - An expression used to stop or pause the action during a hand.

Top Pair - When the player pairs one of his down cards with the highest card on board.

Treys - A pair of 3’s.

Trips - Three-of-a-kind (two cards on the board match one in your hand) (Note: a set is three-of-a-kind in which two of your hole cards match one of the cards on the board).

Turn - This is the fourth community card dealt and instigates the third round of betting.

Two Pair - A hand consisting of two different pairs.

Under the Gun - The first person who must act on the first round of betting (UTG).

Up Card - A card that is dealt face-up.

Walking Sticks - A pair of sevens (77).

Wired Pair - When your hole cards contain a pair.

Worst Hand – A losing hand.

WPT – The World Poker Tour.

WSOP® – World Series of Poker®.

v17_10.06.2014

What is the Genesis of the Poker Term – ‘The Nuts’?

What is the Genesis of the Poker Term – ‘The Nuts

Texas Hold’em originated in the Old West. Legend or poker lore has it that whenever a Texas Hold’em poker player felt that they had the ‘best possible‘ or essentially an ‘unbeatable hand‘ (one that they were willing to bet the ‘ranch’ on, or the ‘pink slip’ in today’s terminology), they would exit the saloon and remove two of the ‘nuts‘ from the wagon wheels and upon their return to the poker table, place them squarely on the table while emphatically stating, ‘I am betting the nuts!‘, or ‘I have the nuts!

Thereafter, whenever a player felt that they had a hand that they were willing to go ‘all the way‘ with or that was unbeatable, they are said to have ‘the nuts.’

v2.03222014

What is the Story/History Behind the NFL Challenge Coins?

NFL CHALLENGE COINS AS POKER CARD PROTECTORS + THE WWI TRADITION

The NFL Challenge Coin is 1 & 3/4″ in diameter and made of die-cast pewter with colored enamel poured by hand and baked to harden. Due to their size and weight, the challenge coins make great poker card protectors. They are larger and heavier than a poker chip.

Each Challenge Coin is two-sidedsee below for a sample of the front and the back:

THE TRADITION

Like so many other aspects of military tradition, the origins of the challenge coin are a matter of significant debate with little in the way of supporting evidence. While many organizations and services claim to have been the originators of the challenge coin, the most commonly held view is that the tradition began in the United States Army Air Service (forerunner to the United States Air Force).

Air warfare was a new phenomenon during World War I, when the army created flying squadrons and manned them with volunteer pilots from every walk of civilian life. While some of the early pilots came from working class or rural backgrounds, many were wealthy Ivy League students who withdrew from classes in the middle of the year, drawn by the adventure and romance of the new form of warfare.

As the legend goes, one such Ivy League wealthy lieutenant, ordered small, solid-bronze medallions (or coins) struck, which he then presented to the other pilots in his squadron as mementos of their service together. The coins were gold-plated, bore the squadron’s insignia, and were quite valuable. One of the pilots in the squadron, who had never owned anything like the coin, placed it in a leather pouch he wore around his neck for safekeeping. A short while later, this pilot’s aircraft was heavily damaged by ground fire (other sources claim it was an aerial dogfight), forcing him to land behind enemy lines and allowing him to be captured by the Germans. The Germans confiscated the personal belongings from his pockets, but they didn’t catch the leather pouch around his neck. On his way to a permanent prisoner of war facility, he was held overnight in a small German-held French village near the front. During the night, the town was bombarded by the British, creating enough confusion to allow the pilot to escape.

The pilot avoided German patrols by donning civilian attire, but all of his identification had been confiscated so he had no way to prove his identity. With great difficulty, he snuck across no-man’s land and made contact with a French patrol. Unfortunately for him, the French had been on the lookout for German saboteurs dressed as civilians. The French mistook the American pilot for a German saboteur and immediately prepared to execute him.

Desperate to prove his allegiance and without any identification, the pilot pulled out the coin from his leather pouch and showed it to his French captors. One of the Frenchmen recognized the unit insignia on the coin and delayed the execution long enough to confirm the pilot’s identity.

Once the pilot safely returned to his squadron, it became a tradition for all members to carry their coin at all times. To ensure compliance, the pilots would challenge each other to produce the coin. If the challenged couldn’t produce the coin, he was required to buy a drink of choice for the challenger; if the challenged could produce the coin, the challenger would purchase the drink.

This tradition spread to other flying squadrons and, eventually, to other military units in all branches of service and even to non-military organizations. Today, challenge coins are given to members upon joining an organization, as an award to improve morale, and sold to commemorate special occasions.

President Bill Clinton displayed several racks of challenge coins, which had been given to him by U.S. service members, on the credenza behind his Oval Office desk. The challenge coins appear in the background of his official portrait, now hanging in the White House.

CHALLENGING

The tradition of a challenge is the most common way to ensure that members are carrying their unit’s coin. The challenge, which can be held at any time, begins with the challenger drawing his/her coin, and slapping or placing the coin on the table or bar (NOTE: If the coin be accidentally dropped, the challenge is still valid). Everyone being challenged must immediately produce the coin for their organization and anyone failing to do so must buy a round of drinks for the challenger and everyone else who has their challenge coin in their possession. In the event that everyone challenged is able to produce their coin, the challenger must buy a round of drinks for the entire group. If you are able to steal a challenge coin everyone in the group must buy you a drink. During a challenge everyone in the group must buy you a drink if you are the holder of the highest ranking coin.

You can purchase the entire collection of NFL Challenge Coins for your favorite NFL team(s) on the TEAM5 website. Enjoy!

v2.10062011



 The Faces that Make TEAM5poker Special

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Poker News (2)

What is the History and Some of the Factoids for the 2011 WSOP?

The World Series of Poker (WSOP©) is a world renown poker event consisting of 58 separate bracelet events held annually in Las Vegas, NV (sponsored by Caesar’s Entertainment).

2011 WSOP© FACTOIDS:

FIRST YEAR OF THE WSOP©: 1970 (In the beginning, Benny Binion invited seven of the best-known poker players to the Horseshoe Casino, in Las Vegas, NV);

NUMBER OF NATIONS REPRESENTED IN THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENT: 85;

THE 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE: Bou-Nahra, Collins, Giannetti, Heinz, Holden, Lamb, Makiievskyi, O’Dea and Staszko;

OLDEST 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE PLAYER: Badih Bou-Nahra (49-years-old);

YOUNGEST 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE PLAYER: Anton Makiievskyi (21-years-old and he has the chance to become the youngest Main Event champion in the WSOP’s 42-year history);

NUMBER OF NATIONS REPRESENTED BY THE 2011 WSOP© NOVEMBER NINE:  7 (the most in the 42-year history of the event);

TOTAL NUMBER OF ENTRANTS IN THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENT:  6,865; and

THE AMOUNT OF THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENT FIRST PLACE PRIZE: $8,711,956 or approximately $8.7M.

THE 2011 WSOP© MAIN EVENTBY THE NUMBERS:

1 – The number of players winning two bracelets this year;

12 – The number of bracelet winners in 2011 whose first WSOP© cash, was a bracelet win;

44 – The number of professional poker players who won WSOP© bracelets this year;

55 The number of ESPN cameras used to capture the 2011 WSOP© Main Event action;

105 – The total number of countries represented at this year’s WSOP©;

416,000 – The average number of viewers watching the live WSOP© Main Event coverage. The two hours of coverage on ESPN drew 646,000 viewers, representing double-digit increases over last year’s ESPN coverage of the WSOP©; and

$4,119,000 – The total dollar value of the rake taken by the WSOP© on the 2011 Main Event (rake: fees collected by the house) (more money than 3rd place will earn in November).

WORLD SERIES of POKER© – MAIN EVENT HISTORY

(2000 thru 2011)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 v20.02022012

 

Poker Terms (10)

What Poker Terms Should I Be Familiar With?

Ace-High - A five-card-hand containing only an Ace (as a high card); and no pair, straight or flush.

Aces Full – A full-house consisting of three aces and any pair.

Aces Up - A hand containing two pairs, one of which is an Ace.

Action - A game in which players are playing a lot of pots is considered an ‘action’ game.

Active Player - A player who still remains in the hand.

Aggressive Player - A player who bets, raises, and re-raises frequently.

Air - A very weak hand.

All-In - The moment when you commit all of your chips to the pot.

American Airlines - Having a pair of Aces as your hole cards (AA).

Angling - Taking action or talking when it is not your turn in order to mislead your opponents. Some consider this to be cheating; others consider these tactics to be part of the game.

Animal - A nickname for a player that is loose-aggressive. Animals are involved in too many hands and will almost always bet and raise whenever the opportunity presents, often with a garbage hand (also referred to as a ‘maniac’).

Ante - A term used in poker to refer to the first money wagered on a hand, or the minimum that each player is required to put into the pot before a new hand can begin.

Baby - A low-ranked card (usually 2 through 5).

Back Door - A draw that requires two cards to complete a straight, flush, or full house (Example: to complete a flush the correct suit must hit on the turn and the river).

Backdoor Flush - A hand with three cards that would support a flush, but needs the remaining turn and river cards to complete the hand.

Backdoor Straight Flush - A hand with three cards supporting a straight flush, but requires the remaining turn and river cards to complete the hand.

Bad Beat - This refers to losing a hand when you were the odds on favorite to win the hand (Example: An example of a bad beat would be holding pocket Aces against a player holding pocket 9’s, and your opponent ends up winning the hand by spiking one of the remaining 9’s in the deck on the river).

Bad Beat Jackpot - A reward or promotion in which the card room or casino offers a jackpot to a player who has lost with a really big hand (usually Aces full or better).

Bankroll - The amount of money you have available with which to play poker over a particular period of time.

Behind - A player at the table who acts after or ‘behind’ you.

Belly-Buster - This is also known as an inside straight draw or gut shot.

Best of It - To be the favorite to win the hand.

Bet - To commit money to the pot.

Bet the Pot - When a player bets the amount of the pot (a valid bet in certain types of games).

Big Blind - The position two to the left of the button, who is forced to pay a full small bet prior to the hole cards being dealt in Texas Hold’em.

Big Slick - Refers to holding an Ace and King as your two private hole cards.

Big Sister - Refers to holding an Ace and Queen as your two pocket cards.

Blank - A card that appears useless (also known as a ‘rag’ or a ‘brick’).

Blinds - Texas Hold’em Poker uses what’s called a ‘blind’ structure, meaning that two people on the table must post a bet prior to seeing their hole cards. Since they are forced to bet without seeing their hole cards, they are playing ‘blind’, thus the name of those bets are called ‘blinds’. There are two blinds, the big blind and the small blind. The small blind position must post half the minimum bet and sits immediately to the left of the dealer. The big blind must post the full minimum bet, and sits immediately to the left of the small blind, two seats to the left of the dealer. As the dealer button rotates around the table, each player takes turns posting the small blind and the big blind bets. This blind structure forces the action on the table since there will always be a pot to win (Example: if you are seated at a $5-10 limit Hold’em table, the small blind must post $5 and the big blind must post $10 bet. As play rotates around the table, each player may choose to call that $10 bet, raise, or fold. When it’s the small blind’s turn, that player is only required to call $5 to play the hand).

Blind Raise – When a player raises without looking at his hand.

Bluff - To bet with an inferior hand in the hope that players will fold and you can take down the pot.

Board - The board refers to the community cards that are dealt face up on the table. In Texas Hold’em, there will ultimately be five community cards on the ‘board’. The board does not include the two private or hole cards dealt to each player (Note: ‘the board plays’ means that the player is stating that the five community cards comprise his best poker hand, and he is not using any of the two private or hole cards dealt to him in order to make his best hand).

Boat - Full House.

Bottom Pair - Making a pair containing the lowest cards on the board.

Broadway - An Ace-high straight (A-K-Q-J-10).

Bubble – The point in a tournament at which only one player must bust out before all others win some money. It is also the person who was unfortunate enough to finish in that position.

Bullets - A pair of Aces (AA).

Bump It - To raise.

Burn Card - Any card placed in the discard rack without being entered into play. After the deck is shuffled and cut, one card is ‘burned.’

Button - A player who is in the designated dealer position. Also called the ‘dealer button’, this is a white puck (usually with the word ‘dealer’ inscribed on it), that signifies the dealer’s position on the table. The dealer’s position is significant because he is the last player to act for that hand. The dealer button rotates around the table, moving a seat left after each hand, so that each player takes turns being ‘on the button’.

Buy-In - The minimum amount of money required to enter any game or tournament, usually five times the maximum bet in a cash game.

Cage - A cashier window located in a casino where chip or money transactions take place (the casino version of a bank).

Call - To place an amount of money equal to a previous players bet.

Calling Station - A player who only calls bets and does not take advantage of their good hands by raising. They also will not fold very often, so you should not bluff them but you need to show down the best hand.

Capped - Describes the situation in limit poker in which the maximum number of raises in the betting round has been reached.

Card Room - The room or area in the casino where poker is played or conducted.

Cards Speak - The face value of a h and in a showdown is the true value of the hand, regardless of a verbal announcement.

Cash Out - To leave the game and convert your chips to cash.

Check - To decline to bet or to pass, when it is your turn to act (the action is on you); however the player retains the right to to act if another player initiates the betting.

Check-and-Raise - The act of checking a hand, in hopes of luring the other player to bet, so that you may then raise over the top of him and build a larger pot to win (also known as check-raise).

Cheques - Chips.

Clock - An expression wherein a player in the hand request the floor person (floor man) to limit the amount of time a player can take to act on his hand. Normally, the floor person gives the player (once it is determined that he has had adequate time to act on his hand) one-minute to act (providing a 10-second warning to the expiration of time)].

Chop - To return the blinds to the players who posted them and move on to the next hand if no other players call. It can also mean to ‘split the pot’.

Collection - The ‘rent‘ paid every half-hour for a seat in a poker game (most often in a time game without an individual per hand rake by the house).

Collection Drop - A fee for each hand dealt paid to the house.

Collusion - When two or more players conspire to cheat in a poker game.

Color Change - A request by a player to change the chips from one denomination to another (also known as color-up).

Community Cards - Cards placed in the middle of the table and shared by all players in Texas Hold’em and Omaha (flop, turn & river).

Connectors - A starting hand of two cards in sequence, such as Q-J, 6-7, or 9-10 (or similar sequential cards).

Cowboys - Two Kings.

Cut - To divide the deck into two sections in such a manner as to change the order of the cards.

Cut Card - Another term for the bottom card or security card (usually plastic consisting of a solid color and sized identically to the cards in play).

Dead Man’s Hand - Two pair consisting of Aces and Eights (Wild Bill Hickok was shot in the back while playing this hand and that incident is the genesis of the naming of this particular hand).

Deuces - A pair of 2’s.

Donkey - Someone who is a bad poker player.

Doyle Brunson - A Hold’em hand consisting of a 10-2 (Doyle Brunson won the world championship two years in a row on the final hand with these cards).

Drawing Dead - Drawing to a hand that, even if it improves, will lose to a made hand that is already superior.

Drop - Fold.

Ducks - A pair of 2’s.

Equity - Your mathematical share of the pot and your chances of winning it.

Expected Value (EV) - The average amount that you will win when betting in the same situation numerous times.

Face Cards - The King, Queen or Jack of each suit.

Family Pot - When everyone at the table has entered the pot.

Favorite - To be a favorite, you have the best chance to win the current hand in play.

Fifth Street - Also known as the ‘river’ card. In flop games, this represents the fifth community card on the table and the final round of betting.

Fill Up - To make a Full House from trips or a set.

Fish - A loose player who loses his or her money regularly.

Flash - To show one or more of your cards, usually when it is not required to do so (also known as a flashed card).

Flat Call - Calling a bet without raising the bet (also known as ‘flatting’).

Floor Person - A card room supervisory employee who seats players, balances tables, and renders decisions and rulings that are most often considered to be final (also known as a floor man).

Flop - In Texas Hold’em, each player has two cards dealt to them, and then shares five community cards. These five community cards, however, do not get dealt at the same time. There are rounds of betting at certain intervals during the deal of the cards. After the first two cards are dealt to each player, there is a round of betting. Then, three of the five community cards are dealt at one time on the board. This is what is known as the ‘flop’ – the first three cards being dealt on the board. The fourth card dealt is called the ‘turn’, and the fifth and final card is known as the ‘river’.

Fold - To throw a hand away and relinquish all interest in the pot.

Flush - Any five cards of the same suit.

Flush Draw - A hand where you have 4 of the 5 cards needed to make a flush. For example, if you are holding two clubs, and the board flops two more clubs, you would be holding a flush draw. You would need to draw an additional club to complete the flush.

Fold - To discard your hand when it is your turn to act (also known as mucking your cards).

Fouled Hand - A dead hand.

Four of a Kind - Four cards of the same number or face value (‘quads’).

Four-Flushed - Having four flush cards in your hand, or on the board (when you have two of the four flush cards in your hand with two additional flush cards on the board, your odds of completing your flush with the use of the turn or river cards are approximately 35%).

Fourth Street - In flop games, it is the fourth community card dealt (also known as ‘the turn’) and initiates the third round of betting.

Free Card - A round in which no player bets.

Free Card Play - Betting or raising in late position on the flop in the hopes that the other players will check to you on the turn, giving you the option of seeing the river card for free.

Free Ride - A round in which no one bets (also known as getting a ‘free card’).

Full House - Any three cards of the same number or face value, plus any other two cards of the same number or face value in combination (also known as a hand with three-of-a-kind and a pair).

Gut Shot - A hand where you have 4 of the 5 cards needed to make a straight, but your 4 cards are not ‘connected’ or in sequential order, so you need a single card in the middle of your straight to complete the straight (Example: You are holding 5-6, and the board shows 7, 9, 10 – at that moment, you have a ‘gut shot’ as only the 8 will complete your straight (also known as an ‘inside straight draw’ or a ‘belly-buster straight draw’).

Gypsy Bet - To open the pot for the size of the big blind.

Hand - The cards in a player’s hand or one game of poker in which a pot is won.

Hit - When the flop cards are helpful to or improve your hand.

Hold ‘em - Also known as Texas Hold ‘em, where the players get two down or hole cards and five community cards.

Hold Up - When a hand that is leading manages to win the pot at the showdown.

Hole Cards - The cards dealt face-down to a player.

Hooks - A pair of Jacks (JJ).

Image - The perception that other players at the table have of your individual playing style.

Implied Odds - Bets that you can reasonably expect to collect in addition to the bets already in the pot, if you make your hand.

Important Money - Money that is not part of your poker bankroll and which should never be committed to a wager or commingled with your poker bankroll (According to Oklahoma Johnny Hale – ‘Never Play Poker with Important Money‘).

In Position - To have position on your opponent is being able to act last post flop (Example: UTG raises and you call on the button and will be in position for the rest of the hand).

Inside Straight - Four cards which require another card between the top and the bottom card to complete a straight.

Inside Straight Draw - Four cards which require another card between the top and the bottom card to complete a straight. Also known as a ‘belly-buster straight draw,’ or ‘gut shot straight draw’.

In Turn –  A term describing when it is permissible for a player to act.

Keep Them Honest - To call at the end of a hand to prevent someone from bluffing.

Key Card - A card that provides a big draw, or makes your hand.

Key Hand - In a session it is the one hand that ends up being a turning point for the player, either for the better or worse.

Kicker - The kicker refers to your tie-breaking card (Example: holding an Ace and King, and the board shows Ace, 5, 7, 2, J – the player would have a pair of Aces with a King kicker).

Kojak - A hand containing a K-J.

Ladies - Two Queens (QQ).

Late Position - The player’s position on a round of betting where the player must act after most of the other players have acted (usually considered to be the two positions next to the button).

Lay Down - When a player folds or mucks his cards.

Lead - The first player to bet into a pot.

Limit - The set amount or amounts that may be bet, often expressed as 5/10 ($5 bets on the first two rounds and $10 bets thereafter).

Limp-In - To come into a hand with a call (rather than a raise) before the flop.

Limper - The first player who calls a bet.

Live Hand - A hand that could still win the pot.

Live One - A player lacking knowledge or experience who plays a lot of hands.

Look - When a player calls the final bet before the show-down.

Loose - To play more hands than advisable.

Main Pot - The center or main pot. Any other bets are placed in a side pot(s) and are contested among remaining players (Example: this occurs when a player(s) goes all-in for less money in the stacks of other players).

Maniac - A very aggressive player who plays a lot of hands.

Middle Pair - To have a pair containing the second highest card on the board.

Middle Position - A location somewhere between early and late positions on a specific round of betting (the fifth, sixth and seventh seats to the left of the button).

Minimum Buy-In - The least amount you can enter a game of poker with.

Miscall An incorrect verbal declaration of the ranking of a hand.

Misdeal - A mistake by the dealer on the dealing of a hand that causes the cards to be reshuffled and a new hand to be dealt.

Monster - A very big hand. In a tournament, a player who begins to accumulate chips after having a small stack is also considered to be a monster.

Muck - To discard a hand (also a term that describes the pile of cards maintained by the dealer containing all cards discarded by players at the table).

No-Limit (NL) - A game where players can bet as much as they like (limited only by the size of their stack) on any round of betting.

Nuts - The best hand possible.

Odds - The probability of making a hand versus the probability of not making a hand.

Off Suit - Cards of differing suits.

Omaha - A game in which each player is dealt four down cards with five community cards. To make your hand, you must play two cards from your hand and three from the board.

Open - To make the first or initial bet on a given round of betting.

Open-Ended Straight - Four consecutive or sequential cards whereby one additional (consecutive or sequential) card is needed at either end to make a straight.

Option - When it is the Big Blind’s turn to act and he has the option of checking or raising the action.

Outs - Cards yet to come that will improve your hand.

Over Card - A card that is higher than other cards, usually in reference to the community cards.

Paint(s) - Face card(s) (Kings; Queens or Jacks).

Pair - Two cards that are the same rank.

Playing the Board - When your best five-card-hand consists of the five cards on the board (Note: The cards on the board are also referred to as ‘community cards’) (also known as using all five community cards as your hand in Hold’em).

Pocket Rockets - Pair of Aces.

Position - Your place in the order of betting action that your seat commands for a particular hand. If you are the first to act first then you are in first position (also known as the order in which you act in a particular hand).

Post - To post a blind so you can enter the hand.

Pot - All the money that has been placed in the middle including all bets, blinds and antes.

Pot Odds - The mathematical computation of the odds of your hand improving, the amount of money in the pot, and the size of the bet that you must call.

Prop - Someone who gets paid by a poker room to play in their games, usually to start games or play in shorthanded games.

Quads - Four of a kind (such as four aces).

Re-Raise - An increase in a wager at least the size of the previous bet which occurs after a raise.

Rake - The house percentage taken from each pot on a per-hand basis (usually 10% to maximum of $4 or $5).

Rags - Weak cards; usually low cards.

Railbird - Someone who is watching a game on the rail.

Raise - To place a higher bet than an opponent has already placed.

Rake - The amount a card room takes from each pot, usually a percentage that has a set upper limit.

Read - An assumption as to what cards a player has.

Re-Raise - To raise after an opponent has raised (also known as two bet).

River - The last remaining community card after which there is one final round of betting.

Rivered - To get beat by a hand that is made on the river.

Rock - This is an extremely tight player at the table.

Round - When the button has moved completely around the table and everyone has had a chance to deal.

‘Rounders’ - A popular poker movie starring Matt Damon.

Royal Flush - The best possible hand, a royal flush is a straight flush involving the Ten, Jack, Queen, King and Ace.

Runner-Runner - To hit both the turn and the river card to make your hand.

Scramble - A face-down mixing of the cards.

Seat Charge - The amount of money some card rooms charge per hour to play in addition to, or in place of, a rake (a time game).

Semi-Bluff - To bet with a hand that may not be the best hand but has a good chance to improve to (or become) the best hand.

Set - Three-of-a-kind (two cards in your hand that match one card on the board) (Note: trips are three-of-a-kind in which one of your hole cards match two cards on the board).

Setup Two suited decks of cards, each with a different color backing, to replace the current decks in play.

Short Buy - A buy-in that is than the required minimum buy-in.

Short Stacked - To possess the smallest stack of chips at the poker table.

Showdown - The final act of determining the winner of the pot after all betting has been completed.

Shuffle - The act by the dealer of randomly mixing the cards before the start of the hand.

Side Pot - An additional pot made when one player is all-in and two or more other players are still involved in the hand.

Small Blind - The amount put in the pot by the person immediately to the left of the dealer ‘button’ prior to the cards being dealt (also known as the smallest blind in a multiple blind game).

Solid - A fairly tight player (a good player).

Speed Limit - A pair of 5’s.

Stay - When a player remains in the game by calling, rather than raising.

Steal - To force the other player to fold when you don’t have the best hand.

Steel Wheel - A five high straight (A-2-3-4-5) of the same suit.

Straddle - A straddle is an additional blind bet which is usually double the size of the big blind (and that player may raise when the action gets to him) in a multiple blind game.

Straight - Five sequential or consecutive cards of any suit.

Straight Flush - Five sequential or consecutive cards of the same suit.

String Bet or Raise - A bet made in more than one motion, without declaration of a raise [Example: the player pushes chips forward (committing them to the pot) and then returns to his stack for additional chips].

Stuck - A player who is losing in a game.

Suited - Cards of the same suit (such as 8 and 9).

Table Stakes - (1) The amount of money that you have in front of you at the table. This is the maximum amount that you can win or lose on any one hand; (2) The requirement that players can wager only the amount of money in front of them at the start of a hand, and can only buy more chips in-between hands.

Tell - An action that a player makes that gives away the strength of their hand.

Texas Hold’em - This is also the name for Hold’em, the most popular form of poker.

The Nuts - The best possible poker hand, based upon a combination of the players hole cards and the board or community cards.

Three of Kind - Three cards of the face value.

Tight - To play fewer hands than normal.

Tilt - When a player is emotionally upset and starts making poor decisions (also known as on-tilt).

‘Time’ - An expression used to stop or pause the action during a hand.

Top Pair - When the player pairs one of his down cards with the highest card on board.

Treys - A pair of 3’s.

Trips - Three-of-a-kind (two cards on the board match one in your hand) (Note: a set is three-of-a-kind in which two of your hole cards match one of the cards on the board).

Turn - This is the fourth community card dealt and instigates the third round of betting.

Two Pair - A hand consisting of two different pairs.

Under the Gun - The first person who must act on the first round of betting (UTG).

Up Card - A card that is dealt face-up.

Walking Sticks - A pair of sevens (77).

Wired Pair - When your hole cards contain a pair.

Worst Hand – A losing hand.

WPT – The World Poker Tour.

WSOP® – World Series of Poker®.

v17_10.06.2014

What is Relative Hand Strength?

RELATIVE HAND STRENGTH: With position in mind, consider your relative hand strength. How strong is your hand from a starting cards perspective? The best two cards that you can look down to see obviously is a pair of aces. However, that is only going to happen once every approximate 220 hands, on average. The worst two cards that you can look down and see pre-flop is 7-2 off-suit. So if A-A and 7-2 off-suit are the extremes, what hands should you play? The answer is most often ‘that depends’. Should you play a middle pair from early position? That is up to you and depends on your unique style of play. Having that same middle pair in late position with a number of players having folded, is a much better situation than having that hand as ‘the first to act.’ A pair of aces against a full table of players wins just under half of the time (assuming that everyone kept their cards for the purpose of this example), but against only one other player it wins better than 4 out of 5 times, on average. So, if you end up with A-A or a strong hand, the odds of winning the pot with that hand increase relative to the number of opponents you play it against. Therefore, it is always better to ‘thin the field’ and ‘protect your hand’ and use position to your advantage.

Understanding the concept of ‘less is more’ in terms of number of opponents is an important concept to grasp. When you have a good hand, isolate. Isolating your opponents and paring down the field improves your chances of dragging the pot your way – more often than not.

v1.08022011

What is Position Play?

PLAYING POSITION

POSITION: Position is one of the most basic rudimentary concepts in all of poker; and it is a very important concept to understand as a beginning poker player. Poker is played around a table usually with 9-10 other players (Stud games are played 8-handed). The dealer button is ground zero for the deal for the hand in question. That is the perspective from which the hand is dealt. If you are to the immediate left of the button, you are the small blind and the ’first to act’ in subsequent betting rounds to the pre-flop betting. In the first round, since you have posted a blind, you act second to last and can opt to call or raise, for the fact that you have but one-half of the big blind committed to the pot. The big blind is to your immediate left. The big blind acts last in the pre-flop betting action, but the big blind (hereinafter SB and BB respectively) has an option to raise in the pre-flop action, if no one other player has raised his big blind.

Think of the button again as the focal point of the action and remember that it rotates clockwise (changes or progresses) every hand. This POSITION gets to act last in each betting round. This is a very powerful advantage in the game of poker. The action starts with the player to the left of the button. As players decide to bet, call, raise, or fold, the player on the button has the advantage of seeing the action of all the other players before he is required to make any decisions. (EXAMPLE: You have a pair of sevens (7-7) in your hand. There has been a bet, a raise, and two calls when it gets around to you. It is safe to say that your sevens have shrunk up a bit and right now you probably do not have the best hand. If the raise was a large one, you should likely fold. This is not information that the person to your left, in the SB position had when they originally opened the betting. When the action gets back to that person, they have the choice of folding their investment in the pot, or calling (or re-raising) the raise. You do not have that burden. Your decision can be made with zero investment in the pot at this point. Compared to the player in the small blind, you are buying a stock today knowing exactly what the price is tomorrow. You have insider information and a big advantage because of your position at the table).

As the last player to act, you can also opt to close the betting by calling. No one can raise or re-raise unless you re-open the betting by raising the bet when the action comes to you. Other players have the ability to raise and re-raise, but when it gets to you, you can close the betting.

v2.03222014

What are Outs?

OUTS:Three strikes, you’re out’ is a common baseball term. Three outs and an inning is over in a baseball game. In poker, an ‘out’ is used to refer to the remaining number of cards in the deck that will make or complete your hand. For example, let’s say that you have KsQs in your hand and the board is Ts-4s-Ad. You need another spade to hit a flush. How many spades are there left in the deck? Well, there are 13 of every suit, right? You have two spades in your hand with two of them on the board. So, of the known cards, (your pocket cards and the community cards) four of them are spades. That means that you can estimate that there are 9 additional spades remaining in the deck. Now, players could have folded their pocket spades, thereby making them unavailable for you to hit them on the turn card or river card, however we have now way of knowing that with certainty. So, we will keep it simple and estimate that there are 9 spades ‘somewhere’ in the deck. Knowing that there are nine spades left, those spades are what we refer to as our ‘outs’. Our opponent is betting and we are calling, hoping that we hit one of those remaining spades. We have now way of ascertaining what our opponent’s hand is of course, but through his actions we will put him on a hand, that is to say, we will mentally assume he has a specific hand. Based on what he has done, let’s say we deduce that he likely has at least an ace in his hand. So he has at least a pair-of-aces as his hand. We know that we are drawing and assume that we need to hit one of our spade outs to beat him (we have other ways to win, but for this example we will explore only hitting our flush). How many cards are in the deck in total? 52. And again, we know what 5 of them are after the flop. After the turn, we will know what 6 of them are (two in the pocket and the board four community cards). So, before the turn card, what are our chances of hitting a spade? Well, on the turn it would be 9 of the 46 unknowns. 9/46 is .1956. So our chances are 9 in 46, or roughly just under 20%. If we stuck around for the river card, we would have an additional shot of 9/45. It might get costly to call though as our opponent will bet to get rid of us and try to ‘take-it-down‘ right there. Unless you have ‘the nuts’ (the best possible hand) then you do not want to give opponents a chance to draw out on you. In this case, the opponent would not want us to hit one of those 9 spades. If he is a skilled player, he will recognize the possibilities and bet enough to insure that we never see the cards to come.

There is actually a simple way to calculate a reasonable approximation of your odds of making that flush, or whatever hand the case may be. It is called ‘the rule of 2 and 4’ (explained under separate FAQ title).

v2.03222014

What is the Rule of 2 & 4?

THE RULE OF 2 AND 4: Now that we understand how to determine our number of outs, we can further explore ‘the rule of 2 and 4.’ In the case of our flush draw, we have 9 outs.

The rule of 2 and 4’ works like this:

With the turn and river still to come, we have 2 chances to hit one of our 9 outs. It is just under 20% in terms of our chance to hit our flush with one attempt (river only); and with two attempts (turn & river) our odds increase to about 35%.  Here is the ‘rule of 2 and 4‘ calculation: With nine outs, on the turn we take our outs and multiply by 4 (4 x 9 = 36, or approximately 36%). That is a close estimation of the actual 35% odds of hitting our flush with the turn and river to come. With only the river to come, we multiply by 2 (9 x 2= 18, or approximately 18%). Those are both very close approximations of the actual probability figures. This is a quick-and-easy way to estimate our odds and decide if it is worth paying to see the cards that are yet to come on the ‘turn‘ and ‘river‘.

The remaining factor in the decision making process worthy of consideration is, ‘How much money is in the pot?’ Why is this important you ask? It is important because if you do not have reasonable ‘pot odds‘, you should not call the bet. ‘Pot odds‘ are further explained under separate title in the FAQ’s.

v2.03222014

What are Pot Odds?

POT ODDS: Now that we know how to calculate outs and figure out the chances or odds of hitting the required cards to make (complete) our hand, we will shift focus to examining the size of the pot. For example, if there is $100 in the pot, we are faced with the flush draw situation that we just explored and we figure our opponent has a straight. Therefore, we need to hit our flush in order to win the pot. Our opponent bets $50. That means there is $150 in the pot now and we have to call $50 to win that amount. $50 to win $150 translates to 3-to-1 odds. Again, what are the chances of hitting our flush in terms of percentage? About 19%, based upon our gouge (‘rule of thumb‘) ‘rule of 2 and 4‘ calculations for a single card draw. However, if we remained in the hand all the way to the river and had yet another chance at hitting or completing our hand – that would translate to roughly 36%. 36% is slightly better than 2-to-1 odds (33.333% being 2:1 of course). So we can deduce that we are getting paid 3-to-1 on a 2-to-1 draw. Sound reasonable? Yes, it is. But as we deduced above, the answer to anything in poker is often ‘it depends’. It is good if our opponent has all of his money committed to the pot and we are not on-the-hook for another round of betting (which would make it even more expensive for us to call on the river). Prior to acting on your calculations, consider how situations like this are likely to play out before you commit yourself to getting involved in a process that it not yet complete. Think it all the way through.

There is another way to view odds that can be even more interesting. With pot odds we are assuming no more money is going to be placed into that pot when we calculate the percentages. What if we had some disguised hand that our opponent was not likely to put us on? We might call a long-odds draw in a situation where we believe that we will win the pot, AND ALL OF THE OTHER PLAYERS CHIPS (THEIR ENTIRE STACK) – if we hit our draw. These are what are called ‘implied odds’ and are discussed under a different title in the FAQ’s.

v2.03222014

What are Implied Odds?

IMPLIED ODDS: In our example above, we were getting paid 3-to-1 on a 2-to-1 draw chance. We concluded that was good. But what if our opponent had $8,500 additional chips in his stack? What if the situation was a straight flush draw and not just a flush draw and we think our opponent has trips or something strong that he would call with? Maybe we think he has the Ace high or nut flush. We would win if we hit our draw and the straight flush. The pot may have insufficient odds in it to make us think about calling assuming he has the best hand right now. However, in some situations, we have to consider the possibility that if we hit our miracle card, we would also get a call from the player for an all-in bet we would make thereafter. That makes the odds a lot bigger than just what is just in the pot. Whereas above we had a situation where we had to call $50 to win $150, if we hit an open ended straight flush draw and we concluded that we would get an all-in call from our opponent because he has hit his ace high or nut flush. We would have to take our opponents $8,500 remaining chips into account as we calculate our odds. Now we would be getting a lot more than just 3-to-1 if we hit our miracle card. These are what are referred to as ‘implied odds.’

v2.03222014

What Does Position Play Look Like Graphically?

 

Dealer or Button:
This is the most desirable position at the poker table, since the player in that position is the last to act on the flop, turn, and river.

Under the Gun (“UTG”)
This player is to the left of the big blind and the first player to act pre-flop (considered to be the worst position in Texas Hold’em, but a player under the gun will actually have a better position post-flop than either the small or big blind).

Big Blind (“BB”)
This is the player to the left of the small blind (unless the game is heads-up).

Small Blind (“SB”)
This player is directly to the left of the button unless the game is heads-up.

Cutoff
This is the player to the right of the button. It is called the cutoff because that position often “cuts off” the dealer’s ability to steal blinds by betting.

Hijack
This is the player to the right of the cutoff. At full table it functions a lot like the cutoff position.

Heads-Up Exception
When play is heads-up, the player on the button is the small blind and the other player is the big blind. When heads-up play commences, the only exception to normal button rotation accounts for the fact that no player can be the big blind twice consecutively; therefore the button is positioned in heads-up play accordingly (occasionally contradicting the normal clockwise rotation).

NOTES

(1) Position is also described in terms of ‘early position‘, ‘middle position‘, and ‘late position‘. These terms are often abbreviated ‘EP‘, ‘MP‘, and ‘LP‘.

(2) Players in ‘early position‘ are some of the first to act in a betting round, like the player who is under the gun.

(3) ‘Late position‘ players are some of the last to act in a betting round, like the cutoff seat and the player on the button; and

(4)Middle position‘ is all positions in-between early and late.

v2.03222014

What Are the Poker Hand Rankings?

Poker Hand Rankings

Royal Flush

The highest hand in poker, the royal flush is a poker hand which contains the A,K,Q,J and 10, all of the same suit.

Straight Flush

A straight flush is a poker hand which contains five cards in sequence, all of the same suit. Two such hands are compared by their high card in the same way as are straights (the low ace rule also applies).

Four-of-a-Kind

Four-of-a-kind, also known as quads, is a poker hand which contains four cards of one rank, and an unmatched card. It ranks above a full house and below a straight flush. Higher ranking quads defeat lower ranking ones. Between two equal sets of four of a kind (possible in wild card and community card games), the kicker determines the winner.

Full House

A full house, also known as a ‘boat‘ or a ‘full boat‘, is a poker hand which contains three matching cards of one rank, plus two matching cards of another rank. It ranks below a four of a kind and above a flush. Between two full houses, the one with the higher ranking set of three wins. If two have the same set of three (possible in wild card and community card games), the hand with the higher pair wins. Full houses are described by the three of a kind (e.g. K-K-K) and pair (e.g. 9-9), as in “kings over nines” (also used to describe a two pair), “Kings full of nines” or simply “Kings full”.

Flush

A flush is a poker hand which contains five cards of the same suit, not in rank sequence. It ranks above a straight and below a full house. Two flushes are compared as if they were high card hands. In other words, the highest ranking card of each is compared to determine the winner; if both have the same high card, then the second-highest ranking card is compared, and so on. The suits have no value: two flushes with the same five ranks of cards are tied. Flushes are described by the highest card in the hand, as in “king-high flush”.

Straight

A straight is a poker hand which contains five cards of sequential rank, consisting of varying suits. It ranks above three-of-a-kind and below a flush. Two straights are ranked by comparing the high card in each hand. Two straights with the same high card are of equal value, and split any winnings (straights are the most commonly tied hands in poker, especially in community card games). Straights are described by the highest card, as in “king-high straight” or “straight to the king”.

A hand such as A,K,Q,J,10 is an ace-high straight, and ranks above a king-high straight such as K,Q,J,10,9. But the ace may also be played as a 1-spot in a hand such as 5,4,3,2,A, called a wheel or five-high straight, which ranks below the six-high straight 6,5,4,3,2. The ace may not “wrap around”, or play both high and low in the same hand: 3,2,A,K,Q.

Three-of-a-kind

Three-of-a-kind, also called trips, or set, is a poker hand which contains three cards of the same rank, plus two unmatched cards. It ranks above two pair and below a straight. Higher ranking three of a kind defeat lower ranking three of a kinds. If two hands have the same rank three of a kind (possible in games with wild cards or community cards), the kickers are compared to break the tie.

Two Pair

A poker hand which contains two cards of the same rank, plus two cards of another rank (that match each other but not the first pair), plus one unmatched card, is called two pair. It ranks above one pair and below three of a kind. Between two hands containing two pair, the higher ranking pair of each is first compared, and the higher pair wins. If both have the same top pair, then the second pair of each is compared. Finally, if both hands have the same two pairs, the kicker determines the winner. Two pair are described by the higher pair, as in “Kings over trey” or simply “Kings up”.

Pair

One pair is a poker hand which contains two cards of the same rank, plus three unmatched cards. It ranks above any high card hand, but below all other poker hands. Higher ranking pairs defeat lower ranking pairs. If two hands have the same rank of pair, the non-paired cards in each hand (the kickers) are compared to determine the winner.

High Card

A high-card or no-pair hand is a poker hand in which no two cards have the same rank (number or letter), the five cards are not in sequence, and the five cards are not all of the same suit. It ranks below all other poker hands. Two such hands are ranked by comparing the highest ranking card; if those are equal, then the next highest ranking card; if those are equal, then the third highest ranking card, and so on. No-pair hands are described by the one or two highest cards in the hand, such as “ace high” or “ace-king high”, or by as many cards as are necessary to break a tie.

v20_02.25.2011

What is the Genesis of the Poker Term – ‘The Nuts’?

What is the Genesis of the Poker Term – ‘The Nuts

Texas Hold’em originated in the Old West. Legend or poker lore has it that whenever a Texas Hold’em poker player felt that they had the ‘best possible‘ or essentially an ‘unbeatable hand‘ (one that they were willing to bet the ‘ranch’ on, or the ‘pink slip’ in today’s terminology), they would exit the saloon and remove two of the ‘nuts‘ from the wagon wheels and upon their return to the poker table, place them squarely on the table while emphatically stating, ‘I am betting the nuts!‘, or ‘I have the nuts!

Thereafter, whenever a player felt that they had a hand that they were willing to go ‘all the way‘ with or that was unbeatable, they are said to have ‘the nuts.’

v2.03222014

T5 (7)

What is Our Focus at TEAM5?

At TEAM5, we are focused on doing business in a manner that promotes exceptional customer service, the highest standard of ethical conduct and fair play.

We are on a quest, constantly striving for excellence and at the same time, seeking to exceed expectation.

Our overriding goal is to never disappoint.

What is TEAM5?

TEAM5 is a premium website supporting the sale of premium poker related products, services and supplies. TEAM5 is the exclusive representative and/or authorized reseller for a number of unique and sought after products. These include the full line of Blue Shark Optics sunglasses – the ultimate poker eyewear (with Crystalion-3™ lens technology providing the optimal solution for the poker player who normally wears dark sunglasses at the poker table. Unique reflective properties act as an impenetrable shield against prying eyes, while other properties allow maximum (UV400) light penetration for optimal viewing), and Quad Queens, Inc.’s entire line of seat cushions/backpacks, to name but a few.

TEAM5 also offers its own line of T5 Gear, branded apparel and accessories offering the poker player a very distinctive look. These include t-shirts, polo shirts, professional sports jerseys, professional sports caps, hats, hoodies, money clips and other exclusive high-end items.

THE TEAM5 WEBSITE OFFERS:

• T5 Products (Shop TEAM5);

• T5 Gear & Exclusive T5 Branded Apparel and Accessories (Shop TEAM5);

• T5 Memberships (6-Month Renewable – Free Agent & Team Captain);

• T5 Programs (Professional, Celebrity, Sponsor, Affiliate & Guest); and

• T5 Professional Services (a full-line of assets protection assistance, Nevada corporate formation and business support & graphic design tools through our affiliate Lucas Lucas, LLC); (a full-line of poker related financial services through our affiliate Tony Capps Management); and (a full-line of website formation and hosting services through our affiliate Max Distro, LLC).

You are invited to explore the TEAM5 website and enjoy!

Also, please check back often as we continue to grow our business and expand our line of unique and innovative products for the discerning poker player.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: T5 offers the highest quality promotions, products, supplies and professional services exclusively. TEAM5 is all about enhancing the overall poker player experience. We are in the business of promoting the business interests of poker players via direct promotion, website support, supervision, financing, sponsorship, business development, marketing, player development, rating of play, and the development of fine-tuned, targeted promotional tools and materials designed to enhance the overall poker player experience.

T5 offers premium poker-related promotions, products, supplies and professional services of the highest quality. T5 offers poker players the ability to promote their professional image and conduct business in a professional and ethical manner. T5 promotes the highest level of ethics in their members and in the conduct of their business.

T5 is staffed by business professionals with expertise and recognized degrees in business; accounting; financial management; communication; and hospitality & casino management. We are focused on doing business in a manner that promotes exceptional customer service, the highest standard of ethical conduct and fair play.

TEAM5poker.com is not a gaming website and does not conduct, nor does it engage directly in, online gambling activities. No wagers are accepted on T5‘s website, which is made available exclusively for sales, informational, and promotional purposes only. T5 does not intend for any information, promotion, product, supply or professional service offered on its website to be used for any kind of illegal purposes, whatsoever.

T5 accepts no responsibility or liability for losses which may be incurred by individuals using any information contained on this site, or links to other sites contained herein, for any purpose whatsoever. Use of any information contained herein is undertaken at user’s sole risk • Promotions, events or other material/s contained on this website may be modified or cancelled without notice and at T5’s sole discretion • Must be 21 • Gambling Problem? 1(800)522-4700 • ‘Know Your Limits’™ •

What T5 Inspirational Quotes Will Help My Game?

Never play poker with important money.” — Oklahoma Johnny

“I started with nothing. Fortunately, I have half of it left.” –Doyle “Dolly” Brunson

“No man is wise enough by himself.” — Plautus

Individuals play the game, but teams win championships.” — Author Unknown

Individual commitment to a group effort — that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” — Vince Lombardi

Teamwork divides the tasks and doubles the successes.” — Author Unknown

The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may have the greatest bunch of individual ‘stars’ in the world, but if they don’t play together, the club won’t be worth a dime.” — Babe Ruth

The greatest danger a team faces isn’t that it won’t become successful, but that it will, and then cease to improve.” — Mark Sanborn

Team Player: One who unites others toward a shared destiny through the sharing of information and ideas, empowering others and developing trust.” — Dennis Kinlaw

TEAMTogether Everyone Achieves More.” — Author Unknown

Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success.” — Henry Ford (1863-1947)

One man can be a crucial ingredient on a team, but one man cannot make a team.” — Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (1947-?)

Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” — T.S. Elliott

The ‘Secret to Success’ is that it is not the absence of failure, but the absence of envy.” — Herodotus

Keep your fears to yourself, but share your courage.” — Robert Louis Stevenson

In teamwork, silence isn’t golden, it’s deadly.” — Mark Sanborn

v2.06272017

What are the Benefits of Becoming a TEAM5 Captain?

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF BECOMING A TEAM5 CAPTAIN?

HERE ARE THE TOP 10 REASON TO BECOME A TEAM5 CAPTAIN:

(1) Team name registration with TEAM5;

(2) Access to T5 professional services and assistance in team logo design for patches, apparel and team promotion;

(3) Receive a 10% discount on all of your purchases of product and services on SHOP TEAM5;

(4) Receive a 10% net rebate on all purchases of product and services made by your team members on SHOP TEAM5;

(5) Access to local T5 League Commissioner support;

(6) Access to T5 tools and scheduling services;

(7) Access to T5 sponsorship;

(8) A guaranteed one-time TEAM5 sponsorship (limitations apply);

(9) Access to a gratis GUEST PASS good for the duration of your T5 membership as a team captain; and

(10) It is fun and it adds a new level of excitement and profit to your poker experience with friends and family.

v1.08022011

 

 

Why Form a Team with TEAM5?

Organize a team with TEAM5 anywhere in the Country to play for fun and/or profit.

v1.08022011

What is the Genesis of the Poker Term – ‘The Nuts’?

What is the Genesis of the Poker Term – ‘The Nuts

Texas Hold’em originated in the Old West. Legend or poker lore has it that whenever a Texas Hold’em poker player felt that they had the ‘best possible‘ or essentially an ‘unbeatable hand‘ (one that they were willing to bet the ‘ranch’ on, or the ‘pink slip’ in today’s terminology), they would exit the saloon and remove two of the ‘nuts‘ from the wagon wheels and upon their return to the poker table, place them squarely on the table while emphatically stating, ‘I am betting the nuts!‘, or ‘I have the nuts!

Thereafter, whenever a player felt that they had a hand that they were willing to go ‘all the way‘ with or that was unbeatable, they are said to have ‘the nuts.’

v2.03222014

What is the Story/History Behind the NFL Challenge Coins?

NFL CHALLENGE COINS AS POKER CARD PROTECTORS + THE WWI TRADITION

The NFL Challenge Coin is 1 & 3/4″ in diameter and made of die-cast pewter with colored enamel poured by hand and baked to harden. Due to their size and weight, the challenge coins make great poker card protectors. They are larger and heavier than a poker chip.

Each Challenge Coin is two-sidedsee below for a sample of the front and the back:

THE TRADITION

Like so many other aspects of military tradition, the origins of the challenge coin are a matter of significant debate with little in the way of supporting evidence. While many organizations and services claim to have been the originators of the challenge coin, the most commonly held view is that the tradition began in the United States Army Air Service (forerunner to the United States Air Force).

Air warfare was a new phenomenon during World War I, when the army created flying squadrons and manned them with volunteer pilots from every walk of civilian life. While some of the early pilots came from working class or rural backgrounds, many were wealthy Ivy League students who withdrew from classes in the middle of the year, drawn by the adventure and romance of the new form of warfare.

As the legend goes, one such Ivy League wealthy lieutenant, ordered small, solid-bronze medallions (or coins) struck, which he then presented to the other pilots in his squadron as mementos of their service together. The coins were gold-plated, bore the squadron’s insignia, and were quite valuable. One of the pilots in the squadron, who had never owned anything like the coin, placed it in a leather pouch he wore around his neck for safekeeping. A short while later, this pilot’s aircraft was heavily damaged by ground fire (other sources claim it was an aerial dogfight), forcing him to land behind enemy lines and allowing him to be captured by the Germans. The Germans confiscated the personal belongings from his pockets, but they didn’t catch the leather pouch around his neck. On his way to a permanent prisoner of war facility, he was held overnight in a small German-held French village near the front. During the night, the town was bombarded by the British, creating enough confusion to allow the pilot to escape.

The pilot avoided German patrols by donning civilian attire, but all of his identification had been confiscated so he had no way to prove his identity. With great difficulty, he snuck across no-man’s land and made contact with a French patrol. Unfortunately for him, the French had been on the lookout for German saboteurs dressed as civilians. The French mistook the American pilot for a German saboteur and immediately prepared to execute him.

Desperate to prove his allegiance and without any identification, the pilot pulled out the coin from his leather pouch and showed it to his French captors. One of the Frenchmen recognized the unit insignia on the coin and delayed the execution long enough to confirm the pilot’s identity.

Once the pilot safely returned to his squadron, it became a tradition for all members to carry their coin at all times. To ensure compliance, the pilots would challenge each other to produce the coin. If the challenged couldn’t produce the coin, he was required to buy a drink of choice for the challenger; if the challenged could produce the coin, the challenger would purchase the drink.

This tradition spread to other flying squadrons and, eventually, to other military units in all branches of service and even to non-military organizations. Today, challenge coins are given to members upon joining an organization, as an award to improve morale, and sold to commemorate special occasions.

President Bill Clinton displayed several racks of challenge coins, which had been given to him by U.S. service members, on the credenza behind his Oval Office desk. The challenge coins appear in the background of his official portrait, now hanging in the White House.

CHALLENGING

The tradition of a challenge is the most common way to ensure that members are carrying their unit’s coin. The challenge, which can be held at any time, begins with the challenger drawing his/her coin, and slapping or placing the coin on the table or bar (NOTE: If the coin be accidentally dropped, the challenge is still valid). Everyone being challenged must immediately produce the coin for their organization and anyone failing to do so must buy a round of drinks for the challenger and everyone else who has their challenge coin in their possession. In the event that everyone challenged is able to produce their coin, the challenger must buy a round of drinks for the entire group. If you are able to steal a challenge coin everyone in the group must buy you a drink. During a challenge everyone in the group must buy you a drink if you are the holder of the highest ranking coin.

You can purchase the entire collection of NFL Challenge Coins for your favorite NFL team(s) on the TEAM5 website. Enjoy!

v2.10062011



 The Faces that Make TEAM5poker Special

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WYLLC (4)

WHY WYOMING IS THE BETTER CHOICE

The Wyoming Advantage

Wyoming is the best state in United States of America in which to do business. FIRST, let us take a look at what it does not have and SECOND we will then explore the many advantages:

What Wyoming does not have:

  • Personal income tax
  • Corporate income tax
  • Inventory tax
  • Gross receipts tax
  • Franchise tax
  • Burdensome Regulations
  • Disclosure of Shareholder Information
  • Business or ‘per-capita’ tax
  • Excise tax
  • Sales, property and inheritance taxes are among the lowest in the United States

CONSIDER THESE WYOMING ADVANTAGES

  • Unlimited ability to issue stock – Most states set a limit on the number of shares that you are authorized to issue. Wyoming has not such limitations. You may issue as many shares as you wish and you can do so without any additional costs or fees by simply making the proper entries in your Articles of Incorporation (Lucas Lucas, LLC will take care of all that for you). Unlimited shares may be of paramount importance to you in particular, if you ever contemplate taking your company public.
  • You can be everything in Wyoming – Some states require that you have more than one person to serve as the various officers and directors of your corporation. Wyoming has not such limitations. One person can fill all of the required corporate positions, affording you the ultimate in flexibility and control.
  • Enjoy anonymity and privacy in Wyoming – The more information about you that appears in the public record, the easier it is for you to become a target in our litigious society. Wyoming has no requirement for the names of shareholders to be filed with the State of Wyoming. It requires only a simple ‘Annual Report’ which requires disclosure of only those assets located within the state of Wyoming and the name of one person (most often the one who submits the report).
  • Restrictions and corporate formalities are at an absolute minimum in Wyoming – If you desire less ‘red tape, bureaucracy and restrictions’ relating to the conduct of business, Wyoming has got you covered.
  • Low annual fees – Annual fees in Wyoming are based solely on the value of corporate assets located within the State of Wyoming. The minimum is $50 and a million in assets within the state of Wyoming would cost you only $200. Additionally, there are no fees for assets located outside of the State of Wyoming.
  • An officer or director cannot be held responsible for the debts of the Corporation — Wyoming law is very strong in this regard and holds generally that as long as you did not intentionally break the law, you are protected from claims against the Corporation.
  • No minimum capitalization is required in Wyoming – A corporate entity can be funded with one dollar, with a million dollars, or any amount that you choose. Although ‘under capitalization’ may not be to your benefit, the choice is yours and Wyoming corporate entities enjoy the ultimate in flexibility.
  • Directors and/or Shareholders meetings may be held anywhere in the World – Meetings do not have to be held in the State of Wyoming.
  • Stock in your Wyoming Corporation may be issued in exchange for ‘anything of value’ – You have the option to use cash, property, services or any valuable consideration at the total discretion of the board of directors.
  • Lifetime proxy — John D. Rockefeller was the first individual to acquire a personal net worth of one billion dollars. When asked late in life how he accomplished such a feat, he is reported to have shared with a young interviewer that his simple secret was to ‘own nothing and control everything.’ Great advice for a host of reasons (consider that no one can take from you that which you do not own). Unfortunately, sometimes that is more easily said than done. By allowing another person or entity to own shares, you can use proxies to maintain complete control. However, most state laws require proxies to expire and be subsequently renewed every six or seven years. If the ‘legal owner’ declined to renew your proxy, you could be literally left with nothing and little or no recourse. However, Wyoming allows for lifetime proxies, thereby protecting you from any of the forgoing problems.
  • If you already have a Corporation – Wyoming offers unparalleled flexibility. By filing a few simple forms (Lucas Lucas, LLC will take care of all that for you), your existing Corporation can become a bona fide Wyoming corporation. Wait it gets even better! Your existing corporation can retain its original incorporation date after becoming a Wyoming corporation. Examination of the Wyoming public record will see a Corporation dating back as far as your current Corporation does. You effortlessly become a Wyoming corporation without losing the many benefits of your entities’ longevity and continuity of operation.

Lucas Lucas, LLC provides general business information and related services. It does not provide legal, accounting, tax or other professional advice. If you need advice concerning the specific applications of our products and/or services, please consult with an attorney or other appropriate professional. Lucas Lucas, LLC will provide references to attorneys or other appropriate certified professionals upon request.

rev2, 06/25/2017

WHY FORM AN LLC IN WYOMING?

HISTORY

Nevada, Delaware, and Wyoming are all typically referred to as ‘corporate havens’ and are all popular jurisdictions to incorporate your business.

Why Incorporate in Wyoming. Wyoming state fees are less than most other states. Wyoming has no business license fees or officer filing fees. This means Lucas Lucas, LLC can deliver a quality corporate entity package for much less than you would pay in Nevada or Delaware.

The first LLC statutes in the United States were instituted in Wyoming in 1977 and changed in 2010 to stay current with the times. Since Wyoming has had limited liability companies available longer than any other state and has the strongest laws protecting members and managers of an LLC, Lucas Lucas, LLC feels that it is the state of choice for establishing corporate entities.

PROTECTION

A Wyoming corporation or LLC offers its officers and directors the highest degree of protection from lawsuits filed in our litigious society. Doing business as a Wyoming Corporation or LLC provides you with asset protection and business privacy.

PRIVACY

Wyoming does not require the manager or any of the members of an LLC to be listed on a public database, whereas Nevada requires a tax ID number of the Company and personal guarantee by the owners on the Nevada State Business License.

FREEDOM

You can operate your Corporation and live anywhere in the world and you are not required to be a US citizen to incorporate in Wyoming.

NO WYOMING STATE TAXES

There are no State taxes in Wyoming on corporations. If you choose to incorporate in Wyoming, your company may not pay State taxes at all.

NEVADA ON THE OTHER HAND HAS BECOME HIGH RISK

If you are comparing Nevada and Wyoming, please keep in mind that the Nevada has recently voted in a bill as of June 2015 installing a corporate gross receipts tax (no deductions allowed). That means that some companies in Nevada will pay more in Nevada state taxes than they would pay California. This same bill raised the yearly fee for Nevada corporation filings by 150%. Nevada has raised rates on corporations by about 400% in the last 8 years.

WYOMING HAS A HISTORY OF BEING TAX FRIENDLY

According to the new 2015 edition of the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index, ‘Wyoming has the most business-friendly tax system of any state,’ and that is for the seventh year in a row.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: Lucas Lucas, LLC provides general business information and related services. It does not provide legal, accounting, tax or other professional advice. If you need advice concerning the specific applications of our products and/or services, please consult with an attorney or other appropriate professional. Lucas Lucas, LLC will provide references to attorneys or other appropriate certified professionals upon request.

LucasLucas-Logo-Design-2 WEBOP

LINK: http://r1llc.com/products-page/lucas-lucas-llc/

REV2; 06/27/2017

HOW DOES WYOMING COMPARE TO NEVADA FOR LLC FORMATION?

HISTORY

Nevada, Delaware, and Wyoming are all typically referred to as ‘corporate havens’ and are all popular jurisdictions to incorporate your business.

Why Incorporate in Wyoming. Wyoming state fees are less than most other states. Wyoming has no business license fees or officer filing fees. This means we can deliver a quality company package for much less than you would pay in Nevada or Delaware.

The first LLC statutes in the United States were instituted in Wyoming in 1977 and changed in 2010 to stay current with the times. Since Wyoming has had limited liability companies available longer than any other state and has the strongest laws protecting members and managers of an LLC, we feel it is the state of choice for establishing LLC’s.

PROTECTION

A Wyoming corporation or LLC offers its officers and directors the highest degree of protection from lawsuits filed in our litigious society. Doing business as a Wyoming Corporation or LLC provides you with asset protection and business privacy.

PRIVACY

Wyoming does not require the manager or any of the members of an LLC to be listed on a public database, whereas Nevada requires a tax ID number of the Company and personal guarantee by the owners on the Nevada State Business License.

FREEDOM

You can operate your Corporation and live anywhere in the world and you are not required to be a US citizen to incorporate in Wyoming.

NO WYOMING STATE TAXES

There are no State taxes in Wyoming on corporations. If you choose to incorporate in Wyoming, your company may not pay State taxes at all.

NEVADA ON THE OTHER HAND, HAS BECOME HIGH RISK

If you are comparing Nevada and Wyoming, please keep in mind that the Nevada has recently voted in a bill as of June 2015 installing a corporate gross receipts tax (no deductions allowed). That means that some companies in Nevada will pay more in Nevada state taxes than they would pay California. This same bill raised the yearly fee for Nevada corporation filings by 150%. Nevada has raised rates on corporations by about 400% in the last 8 years.

WYOMING HAS A LONG HISTORY OF TAX FRIENDLINESS

According to the new 2015 edition of the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index, ‘Wyoming has the most business-friendly tax system of any state,’ and that is for the seventh year in a row.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: Lucas Lucas, LLC provides general business information and related services. It does not provide legal, accounting, tax or other professional advice. If you need advice concerning the specific applications of our products and/or services, please consult with an attorney or other appropriate professional. Lucas Lucas, LLC will provide references to attorneys or other appropriate certified professionals upon request.

LucasLucas-Logo-Design-2 WEBOP

LINK: http://r1llc.com/products-page/lucas-lucas-llc/

REV2; 06/27/2017

JUST HOW BUSINESS TAX FRIENDLY IS WYOMING?

WYOMING IS THE MOST BUSINESS-FRIENDLY TAX SYSTEM OF ANY STATE IN THE UNION FOR 9-YEARS-IN-A-ROW – 2017

 

According to the new 2017 edition of the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index, ‘Wyoming has the most business-friendly tax system of any state,’ and that is for the ninth year in a row.

The Tax Foundation is the nation’s leading independent tax policy research organization. Since 1937, our principled research, insightful analysis, and engaged experts have informed smarter tax policy at the federal, state, and local levels. We improve lives through tax policy research and education that leads to greater economic growth and opportunity.

LINK: https://taxfoundation.org/2017-state-business-tax-climate-index-released-today/

2017 SBTCI - National Map